“Get Out” Shows How Scary Racism Really Is

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If you haven’t seen the new film, Get Out, I’m certain you’ve heard about it by now.  This out-of-the-box thriller surely left audiences with lots to discuss.  Before I continue, I will give a much needed spoiler alert, so if you have not seen the movie…GET OUT (pun intended)! 

Alright, let’s get to it.  It’s taken me a couple of weeks to gather my thoughts because there was A LOT to process.  There were moments when I laughed so hard, scenes when I jumped because of the suspense, and also moments when my jaw was on the floor.  Get Out‘s director, Jordan Peele, pushed the envelope and as crazy as it seems, his depiction of race relations in this country was strikingly real.

The movie was a great depiction of how blacks are often perceived by other races…specifically, the white race.  I didn’t walk away thinking that white people were the devil or that blacks shouldn’t date whites, but I did walk away thinking that Get Out was one of the first films I’ve seen that correctly shed light on what blacks sometimes experience.  Yes, the movie was an extreme depiction because I have faith that society would never get to the point where white people would literally hypnotize black people into a modern-day form of slavery.  However, the film does address the actual existence of racism and the admittance of historical slavery, through very deliberate references and strong symbolism.

Danithedreamgirl

Source: Google Images

If you haven’t seen the new film, Get Out, I’m certain you’ve heard about it by now.  This out-of-the-box thriller surely left audiences with lots to discuss.  Before I continue, I will give a much needed spoiler alert, so if you have not seen the movie…GET OUT (pun intended)!

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America’s Lies: I Am Not Your NEGRO

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academichustler1975

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Last Friday (February 3, 2017), I was privileged to watch the documentary called, I am not your Negro featuring James Baldwin and directed by Raoul Peck.  Baldwin was just getting into a new book titled, Remember This House in 1979 on the lives and assassinations of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. and how it affected him during that time.  He was very close friends with each of them and their deaths were particularly hard on him as a black man.  Unfortunately, James Baldwin dies in 1987 and wasn’t able to finish his work…but Raoul Peck decided to bring it alive in 2017.  Thank you, Raoul!  Here are my thoughts on this film.

America’s Lies

America has been lying to all of us for years.  In the film, there was an image of Doris Day with perfect coiffed hair, small waist, beautiful outfit, creamy skin with rosy cheeks…

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February: Affirming a Smart Legacy

BronxBeyondBorders

arturo_alfonso_schomburg Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, born and raised in Puerto Rico and grew to prove that African Americans and African Carribeans have a history, a relevance, and have unleashed countless contributions to their adoptive societies. A great collector of historical documents. Established the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York.

tubman-on-slaves Soldiering, spying, and slave resistance in a time without technology. A wonder.

By:  E. R. Smith

In our early history there was no Snapchat, Instagram, LinkedIn;

Facebook was church.

Social media was all religions and therein movements grew; after decades became televised.

Tweets; kept everyone off the city bus one year.

Instant Message; was the Jim Crow signs in our neighborhoods.

Ping back by reminding everybody; “What preacher said Sunday?”

james-weldon-johnson-poet-quote-as-yet-the-negroes-themselves-do-notLinkedIn was a community barber; or hair salon.

eHarmony was socials, bible study, and family picnics.

What is now thought of as soft, old, corny; schooled the toughest and most tenacious fighters.

Call it dull…

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Black Power, Black Manhood, and Black Womanhood: Voices from the Past and Present

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academichustler1975

‘Wathint’ Abafazi, Wathint’ Imbokodo’

(you strike the women, you strike the rock)

I think this is my time now and I’m goin’ to take it. Anybody’d be crazy not to take it.… I just don’t care about anything else right now but takin’ what my mother and my grandmother oughtta have had and they didn’t get it. —Anonymous black woman interviewed by Josephine Carson, Silent Voices: The Southern Negro Woman Today (1969)

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Spokesmen argued that black men were more damaged by racism than black women, that men should be the leaders, head of the household, and dominant. Black women were empowered and thrilled by the Black Power movement, including the Black Panther Party, but many had critiques of its male chauvinism, common to many nationalist movements.

A central goal of the Black Power and black nationalist political movement was for the black man to recover the manhood that had been destroyed…

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She Looks Like Me: Reflections on Diversity (A Rewrite)

Tay LaRoi

meThe picture to the left is me (give or take a Snapchat filter). My father is a fair-skinned black man and my mother is a white woman, which is why I look the way I do. Due to my mixed heritage, I have a very complicated relationship with my unbelievably curly hair. When it grows, it doesn’t get long, it gets big.  And by big I mean huge. Like, routinely-loose-bobby-pins-in-it-I-am-not-kidding-that-actually-happens huge, which is why I wear it short.  It’s also why I get extremely excited when I meet other girls, primarily mixed and black girls, with hair like mine. I feel like it gives us an instant connection to build on and, if they wear their hair long, I can’t help but admire their patience. I’ve struck up long engaging conversation with total strangers just with complements about their hair, questions about products, and thoughts on styles.

I form a similar…

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Black Woman, Where does it Hurt? EVERYWHERE

academichustler1975

Tonight is New Year’s Eve and I just finished watching the movie, Fences starring Viola Davis and Denzel Washington with one of my girlfriends and it left me speechless.  I went through so many emotions…hate, love, joy, and many more.  It was a great and powerful movie and I really enjoyed it.  The resilience that was expected of black women is still expected today. That’s what was heartbreaking about the movie and why my feelings were contorted in my mind.  I will not bash Denzel’s character because its more than him and his affair and his failed “hoop” dreams.  Throughout the movie it was always about Denzel’s character, Troy Maxson, as a father, and husband along with the emotional invisibility of Rose (his wife) for the past 18 years of their marriage.

Rosein the 1950s is the Rose in the 2000s because our “perfect” role has never…

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BLW Interview w/ The last video of Jerry Heller talking about N.W.A members

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Motivation Monday – Just Keep on Livin’

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BLW Interview w/ King Keraun talking about the Chris Brown arrest & Colin Kaepernick’s protest

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BLW Interview w/ Couples Therapy, Jenn Mann talks Anthony Weiner’s sexting scandal

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