Health Benefits of Eating Nuts – Cashews can help Depression



  • Nuts and seeds are rich in energy and nutrients. Nuts nutrition loaded with excellent source of monounsaturated-fatty acids (MUF) such as oleic and palmitoleic acids, which help to lower LDL or “bad cholesterol” and increase HDL or “good cholesterol.” Research studies suggest that Mediterranean diet that is rich in MUF to prevent coronary artery disease, strokes by favoring healthy blood lipid profile.
  • They are rich source of all important omega-3 essential fatty acids like Linoleic acid, a-Linolenic acid (ALA), Eicosapentaenoic acid, Docosahexonic acid Research studies have suggested that n-3 or ?-3 fats by their virtue of anti-inflammatory action help to lower the risk of blood pressure, coronary artery disease, strokes and breast, colon and prostate cancers. Omega-3 fatty acids also offer some benefits in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and in cases of Schizophrenia, depression and Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Nuts and seeds are the storehouse of health benefiting poly-phenolic flavonoid antioxidants such as carotenes, resveratrol, lutein, cryptoxanthin, etc. These compounds have been found to offer protection against cancers, heart disease, degenerative nerve disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and viral/fungal infections. Studies suggests that resveratrol in peanuts reduces stroke risk by alterating molecular mechanisms in the blood vessels, reducing their susceptibility to vascular damage through decreased activity of angiotensin (a systemic hormone causing blood vessel constriction that would elevate blood pressure) and increased production of the vasodilator hormone, nitric oxide.
  • Nuts nutrition is complete in the sense that in addition to calories, and vitamins, they are rich source of minerals like manganese, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, fluoride and selenium. Manganeseis a co-factor for the enzyme superoxide dismutase, which is a very powerful free radical scavenger. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Copper is required for the production of red blood cells. Iron is required for red blood cell formation. Fluoride is a component of bones and teeth and plays important role in prevention of dental caries.
  • They contain very good levels of vitamin-E, a powerful lipid soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E is required for maintaining the integrity of cell membrane of mucus membranes and skin; thus, protecting it from harmful oxygen-free radicals.
  • Nuts nutrition provides many vital B-complex groups of vitamins such as riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B-6, and folates. These vitamins are essential for optimum health and well-being.


Two handfuls of cashews is the therapeutic equivalent of a prescription dose of Prozac. Inside you, the essential amino acid L-tryptophan is broken down into anxiety-reducing, snooze-inducing niacin. Even more important, tryptophan is also made into serotonin, one of your body’s most important neurotransmitters.

Serotonin gives a feeling of well-being and mellowness, or as the Australians would say, “no worries.” This is such a profound effect that Prozac, Paxil and similar antidepressants usually either mimic serotonin or artificially keep the body’s own serotonin levels high. You can do the same thing with your food. And no one can tell us that beans, peas, cheese, nuts and wheat germ are toxic if you eat a lot of them!

Plenty of carbohydrates (starches) in your meals help tryptophan get to where it does the most good: in your brain. In order to cross the blood-brain barrier to get in, carbos are required. So cheese and crackers provides a better effect than the cheese standing alone. An egg or two on toast is better than just the egg. Beans, peas, and nuts already contain carbohydrate, so you are all set there.

Credit: Nutrition and You

Seared Pork Tenderloin with Apples and Broccoli Recipe



1 apple bourbon pork tenderloin, trimmed of fat and sliced into 1-inch pieces
2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp nutmeg
 2 tsp ground coriander
2 Tbs. butter
2 apples (I think mine were gala?), thinly sliced
1 large shallot, thinly sliced
1/4 cup apple cider
2 heads broccoli, florets separated
coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
1 small sprig of fresh thyme


In a small bowl, combine the cinnamon, nutmeg, ground coriander and a pinch of salt and pepper. Sprinkle both sides of the sliced pork with the spice mixture.

Heat a cast iron (or large skillet) over medium high. Sear the pork for about 3 minutes on each side, until cooked through and browned all over. Remove from pan and cover to keep warm.

Back in the pan, add the butter and melt. Add the shallots and sauté until they start to soften, 2 minutes. Add the apples and broccoli to the pan, continuing to sauté until another 2 minutes. Add the apple cider and sauté two more minutes, or until everything is so glorious you need to rest. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Nestle the pork back in (with the accumulating juices) and cook about a minute longer, incorporating the flavors.

Serve dish garnished with fresh thyme leaves!

Credit: Bev Cooks

You are what you’re feeling, so feel happy!!! – The Effects of Negative Emotions on our Health



Humans experience an array of emotions, anything from happiness, to sadness to extreme joy and depression. Each one of these emotions creates a different feeling within the body. After all, our body releases different chemicals when we experience various things that make us happy and each chemical works to create a different environment within the body. For example if your brain releases serotonin, dopamine or oxytocin, you will feel good and happy. Convexly, if your body releases cortisol while you are stressed, you will have an entirely different feeling associated more with the body kicking into survival mode.

What about when we are thinking negative thoughts all the time? Or how about when we are thinking positive thoughts? What about when we are not emotionally charged to neither positive nor negative? Let’s explore how these affect our body and life.


Is there duality in our world? Sure, you could say there is to a degree, but mostly we spend a lot of time defining and judging what is to be considered as positive and what we consider to be as negative. The brainis a very powerful tool and as we define what something is or should be, we begin to have that result play out in our world. Have you ever noticed, for example that someone driving can get cut off and lose their lid, get angry and suddenly they are feeling negative, down and in  bad mood? Whereas someone else can get cut off while driving and simply apply the break slightly and move on with their day as if nothing happened. In this case, the same experience yet one sees it as negative while the other doesn’t. So are things innately positive and negative? Or do we define things as positive and negative?


After thinking about it for a moment you might realize that there are in fact no positive or negative experiences other than what we define as such. Therefore our very perception of an experience or situation has the ultimate power as to how we will feel when it’s happening and how our bodies will be affected. While we can always work to move beyond our definitions of each experience and move into a state of mind/awareness/consciousness where we simply accept each experience for what it is and use it as a learning grounds for us, we may not be there yet and so it’s important to understand how certain emotions can affect our health.

“If someone wishes for good health, one must first ask oneself if he is ready to do away with the reasons for his illness. Only then is it possible to help him.” ~Hippocrates


The connection between your mind and body is very powerful and although it cannot be visually seen, the effects your mind can have on your physical body are profound. We can have an overall positive mental attitude and deal directly with our internal challenges and in turn create a healthy lifestyle or we can be in negative, have self destructive thoughts and not deal with our internal issues, possibly even cloak those issues with affirmations and positivity without finding the route and in turn we can create an unhealthy lifestyle. Why is this?

Our emotions and experiences are essentially energy and they can be stored in the cellular memory of our bodies. Have you ever experienced something in your life that left an emotional mark or pain in a certain area of your body? Almost as if you can still feel something that may have happened to you? It is likely because in that area of your body you still hold energy released from that experience that is remaining in that area. I came across an interesting chart that explores some possible areas that various emotions might affect the body.

When you have a pain, tightness or injuries in certain areas, it’s often related to something emotionally you are feeling within yourself. At first glance it may not seem this way because we are usually very out of touch with ourselves and our emotions in this fast paced world, but it’s often the truth. When I’ve had chronic pains in my back, knees, neck or shoulders, it wasn’t exercise, physio or anything in a physical sense that healed it, it was when I dealt with the emotions behind it. I know this because I spent the time and money going to physio and even though I wanted and believed I would get better, something wasn’t being addressed still. The more I addressed the unconscious thought pattern and emotions throughout my body, the more thins loosened up and pain went away.

When you get sick or are feeling a lot of tightness and pain, often times our body is asking us to observe yourself and find peace once again within yourself and your environment. It’s all a learning and growing process we don’t have to judge nor fear.


Davis Suzuki wrote in ‘The Sacred Life’, ‘condensed molecules from breath exhaled from verbal expressions of anger, hatred, and jealousy, contain toxins. Accumulated over 1 hr, these toxins are enough to kill 80 guinea pigs!’ Can you now imagine the harm you are doing to your body when you stay within negative emotions or unprocessed emotional experience throughout the body?

Remember, you have all the power in you to get through anything life throws at you. Instead of labeling with perception the concepts of negative and positive as it relates to each experience you have in your life, try to see things from a  big picture standpoint. Ask yourself, how can this help me to see or learn something? Can I use this to shift my perception? Clear some emotion within myself? Realize something within another and accept it? Whatever it may be, instead of simply reacting, slow things down and observe. You will find you have the tools to process emotions and illness quickly when you see them for what they are and explore why they came up. If you believe you will get sick all the time, and believe you have pain because it’s all out of your control, you will continue to have it all in an uncontrollable manner until you realize the control you have over much of what we attract within the body.

Credits: Joe Martino of Collective Evolution

Motivation Monday – Go get it


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Happy National Kick Butts Day!!! – What are you doing to kick the habit?



Kick Butts Day is a national day of activism that empowers youth to stand out, speak up and seize control against Big Tobacco.

On Kick Butts Day, teachers, youth leaders and health advocates organize events to:

  1. Raise awareness of the problem of tobacco use in their state or community;
  2. Encourage youth to reject the tobacco industry’s deceptive marketing and stay tobacco-free; and
  3. Urge elected officials to take action to protect kids from tobacco.

Kick Butts Day is organized by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. The first Kick Butts Day was held in 1996.  


The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids is a leading force in the fight to reduce tobacco use and its deadly toll in the United States and around the world. Our vision: A future free of the death and disease caused by tobacco.

We work to save lives by advocating for public policies that prevent kids from smoking, help smokers quit and protect everyone from secondhand smoke. To achieve our mission, we:

  1. Promote public policies proven to reduce tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke. These include higher tobacco taxes, comprehensive smoke-free laws, well-funded tobacco prevention and stop-smoking programs, and tough regulation of tobacco products and marketing.
  2. Expose and counter tobacco industry efforts to market to children and mislead the public.
  3. Strengthen tobacco control efforts in the United States and worldwide by providing support and information to our many partners.
  4. Mobilize organizations and individuals to join the fight against tobacco.
  5. Empower a tobacco-free generation by fostering youth leadership and activism.
  6. Inform the public, policy makers and the media about tobacco’s devastating consequences and the effectiveness of the policies we support.

The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that accepts no government or tobacco industry funding. We rely on contributions from individuals, philanthropic foundations, corporations and other non-profit organizations.

Get more information from Kick Butts Day

Brussels Sprout and Chorizo Beer Hash Recipe by Food 52


Brussels Sprout and Chorizo Beer Hash

  • 1pound Brussels sprouts (outside leaves removed)
  • 3Chorizo links, outer casing removed and crumbled (can also use dried)
  • 1cup beer (I used Great Lakes Dortmunder)
  • 4Large eggs
  • 4Medium blue or red potatoes, halved
  • 1Shallot, diced
  • 3Cloves garlic, minced
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  1. Bring 2 medium pots of salted water to a boil. Toss your whole Brussels sprouts into one for 5 minutes. Toss your potatoes into the other for 10. Drain both.
  2. In a large sauté pan with high sides, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add chorizo and cook for about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and shallots and cook for 3 minutes. Add a bit of salt and pepper.
  3. Trim the bottom of the Brussels sprouts and cut in half. Add your Brussels sprouts to the pan with the chorizo and cook for about 7 minutes, until they have started to brown. Note that the bottom of your pan will start to build a bit of a crust. Worry not: you will de-glaze it with the beer shortly.
  4. Peel the skin off the potatoes, and cut into 1 inch cubes. Toss into the pan after the brussels sprouts have browned. Add a little more salt and pepper to the dish. De-glaze the bottom of the pan with the beer. Let the potatoes cook for about 5 minutes, until they start to brown a little bit. Add more beer if necessary to make sure you get all the flavors off the bottom of the pan.
  5. Cook your eggs in butter with a dash of salt in a separate pan, for about 2-3 minutes, just until the egg white is no longer runny, but the yolk still is. 
  6. Serve the egg over the hash while both are still piping hot! Enjoy.

Credit: Food 52

National Noodle Day!!! – Noodle Facts – 5 Creative Cup Noodle Creations (Video)



  1. Australians consume more than 18 million kilograms of noodles every year – that’s almost one kilogram per person!
  2. In Japan, it is considered good form to loudly slurp your noodles as a way of telling your host that you are enjoying the meal.
  3. Noodles symbolise longevity in China.
  4. Noodles have been created from flour and water since 1000BC and today they are more popular than ever.
  5. Noodles are low in fat and have a very low sodium content.

Credit: Foodimentary Photo Credit: FunnyJunkSite

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Taco Tuesdays – Happy National Taco Day!!! – What’s your favorite Taco Recipe?


plate with taco

It’s National Taco Day! A taco is a traditional Mexican dish made with chicken, beef, vegetables, or seafood. The filling is folded inside a soft or hard tortilla and garnished with toppings such as cheese, salsa, or guacamole.

In 1520, the conquistador Hernando Cortez wrote to King Charles V of Spain to describe his experiences in the New World. In his letter he mentioned a delicious meal the Aztec inhabitants prepared with “tlaxcalli” or “tortilla.” It is the first historical reference to tacos!

Credit: Punchbowl; Photo Credit:

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Mashed Potato, Cheddar and Chive Waffles




4 tablespoons unsalted butter

1/4 cup buttermilk

2 large eggs

2 cups mashed potatoes

3 tablespoons chopped chives

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

1 cup grated cheddar cheese


Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium-low heat.  As the butter melts it will begin to crackle and pop.  That’s the water evaporating out of the butter.  Continue to cook the butter until the crackling subsides and the butter begins to brown a bit.  The butter will smell nutty.  Immediately transfer the browned butter into a medium bowl. Whisk in buttermilk and eggs until thoroughly combined.  Add the mashed potatoes and 2 tablespoons chives and gently stir to combine.

In a small bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, pepper, and garlic powder.  Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients.  Use a spoon to mix until all of the flour is thoroughly combined.  Try not to overmix the batter.  Just stir it until the flour is combined.

Heat a waffle iron and grease if necessary.

Dollop batter (about 1/4 cup per waffle) into the waffle iron.  Cook until golden on each side.  The amount of time depends on your waffle iron.  Remove waffles from  the iron and place on a cooling rack to rest.  The cooling rack will keep the waffles from getting soggy on the bottom as they cool.

Just before serving the waffles, turn oven to the broiler setting.  Place waffles on a baking sheet and top with cheddar cheese.  Place waffles under the broiler until cheese is melted, about 30 seconds to 1 minute.  Remove from the oven, sprinkle with remaining chives and serve warm (with salsa is delicious!).  

Credit: Joy The Baker

Happy National Corned Beef Hash Day!!! – Homestyle Corned Beef Hash




  • 1 pound potatoes (russet or red), scrubbed and diced into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 1 small green pepper, seeds and ribs removed, diced
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 pound or more cooked corned beef, cut into 1/2-inch cubes or shredded (about 2-3 cups)
  • Salt and pepper to taste



  • Boil the potatoes in boiling water for 5 minutes, until just tender. Drain.
  • In a large non-stick skillet, add the oil and butter and finish the potatoes in the pan over medium heat, about 4 minutes. Add the onion, peppers and garlic and cook for another 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add corned beef and seasonings to taste, turning hash, until browned and crisp, about 10 minutes.

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