Nordstrom is selling jeans with mud on them for $425

single parent superstar

muddy jeansOn Nordstrom’s website,  you can buy a pair of PRPS Barracuda Straight Leg Jeans for the low, low price of $425. These jeans are unique in that, according to the website, they “…embody rugged, Americana workwear that’s seen some hard-working action with a crackled, caked-on muddy coating that shows you’re not afraid to get down and dirty.”  Ummmm…

The irony here is that most hard-working Americans that would actually do the work that would get their jeans muddy would never buy a pair of jeans for $425.  In fact, this is kind of an affront to hard-working Americans.  And as I see the divide between the richest 1% of Americans and the rest of us who have to work for a living widen more and more, this is kind of an affront to all of the hard working people I know.  I remember one guy I grew up with…

View original post 442 more words

Advertisements

HOW HAS DYING MY HAIR PINK CHANGED MY LIFE

JUST LIKE HEAVEN

pink hair

Hi there humans! In case some of you are that moony, suprise! I died my hair pink, yes, it’s been about two months now and I’m loving every single day I live with it on my head. So today I want to tell you a bit about my experience with such a drastic change.

¡Hola humanos! En caso de que algunos de ustedes sean tan despistados, ¡sorpresa! me pinté el cabello de rosa, han pasado casi dos meses y amo cada día que vivo con él en mi cabeza. Es por eso que hoy quiero platicarte sobre mi experiencia con éste drástico cambio.

pink hair_1

To get pink hair you need to bleach your hair, especially if you, like I did, have really dark hair, bleaching is a chemical process that unfortunately damages your hair in order to strip it from its natural shade.

Para tener cabello rosa necesitas decolorarte el cabello…

View original post 884 more words

Pauley Perrette Severe Allergic Reaction to Hair Dye – The Dangers in Hair Coloring and Safer Alternatives

7

pauley_perrette

NCIS actress Pauley Perrette is warning fans about the dangers of hair dye after suffering a severe allergic reaction to her trademark ink-black color.

Many consumers are growing in their watchfulness as to what goes in their bodies, but health can be as greatly impacted by what goes on their bodies. We already realize that chemicals in cosmetics such as skin creams can break through the skin barrier, but what about the chemicals in hair coloring? In response to recent bad press about hair dyes, many have turned to semi-permanent solutions. However, there is reason to question the safety in the substances used in these products as well. If you are among the 50% of women who color their hair, or a man who covers his gray, you might want to do more investigation into your favorite hair coloring.

The most problematic hair dye ingredient is a family of chemicals called Arylamines. Arylamines are a known risk factor for bladder cancer and have been found to cause cancer in experimental animals. One of these is p-phenylenediamine (PPD) which is listed on the box of even non-permanent “natural” products. It is an important ingredient in hair coloring because it lasts through many washings and perming is possible with it. PPD hair dyes usually come packaged as 2 bottles, one containing the PPD dye preparation and the other containing the developer or oxidizer. PPD is a colorless substance that requires oxygen for it to become colored. It is this intermediate, partially oxidized state that may cause allergy in sensitive individuals. Fully oxidized PPD is not a sensitizer, so individuals with PPD allergy can wear wigs or fur coats dyed with PPD safely.

Another factor involves the mixing of hydrogen peroxide with ammonia. Research has found that this combination may create potentially carcinogenic chemicals that don’t normally exist in the two liquids prior to mixing them together.

A third factor is that the darker dyes are more challenging as they contain greater levels of chemicals. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) stated that skin contact with PPD should be prevented in order to avoid the allergic reactions, and indeed, the FDA has NOT approved its use for direct skin application. This is an oxymoron, though, as it is next to impossible to avoid contact with the skin when applying hair color.

Safer alternatives to ammonia and peroxide are being developed. One company’s organic and mineral research laboratory has found a way of making peroxide from avocado oil and it is far less irritating to the skin. They have also discovered an alternative to ammonia. Derived from coconut oil, it isn’t irritating and has no nasty smell. Look for products that are ammonia and peroxide-free and use vegetable-based dyes. A search on the web for “natural hair colorings” should turn up a few good leads. Two examples are Planet Organic and Aveda. Some of these companies state that their formulas provide longer lasting color than the older vegetable rinses.

Many people have tried henna as a solution. Henna’s effect lasts longer than a vegetable rinse and adds a wonderful shine, highlights and bounce to the hair. Henna products, which are gluten-free and animal-cruelty-free, are not always a red color, but all henna contains and imparts a little red. Today this natural dye comes in a wide array of shades, not just red, but will not lighten hair. Henna enhances your natural color rather than totally covering it, which allows some of your natural highlights to come through. The coating and sealing advantages mentioned above are inherent with henna.

As always, it is up to you, the consumer, to do the research and to become responsible for your own health, in regard to what goes on your body in addition to what goes in it.


Credit: Natural News –naturalnews.com