Full of Bologna Hot Dish Recipe



Prep Time: 20 Min

Cook Time: 30 min

Total Time: 50 min

Makes: 6


  • 1 ring Nueske Bologna, diced
  • 4 medium potatoes, sliced or diced
  • 1 can cream of celery soup
  • 2 Tbsp. onion, chopped
  • 2 Tbsp. green pepper, chopped (optional)



Mix all the ingredients together and place in casserole dish. Bake at 350° for 30 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Top with cheese and return to oven to melt cheese, about 5 minutes. Serve hot.

Double layer Pumpkin Cheesecake Recipe





2 (8 ounce) packages cream cheese, softened

1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 eggs
1 (9 inch) prepared graham cracker crust
1/2 cup pumpkin puree
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 pinch ground cloves
1 pinch ground nutmeg
1/2 cup frozen whipped topping, thawed
  • PREP
30 mins
  • COOK
40 mins
4 hrs 10 mins



  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).
  • In a large bowl, combine cream cheese, sugar and vanilla. Beat until smooth. Blend in eggs one at a time. Remove 1 cup of batter and spread into bottom of crust; set aside.
  • Add pumpkin, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg to the remaining batter and stir gently until well blended. Carefully spread over the batter in the crust.

Bake in preheated oven for 35 to 40 minutes, or until center is almost set. Allow to cool, then refrigerate for 3 hours or overnight. Cover with whipped topping before serving.


Chocolate Cupcake Day!!!! – Quick Double Chocolate Cupcakes Recipe





1 box devil’s food cake mix, such as Duncan Hines Moist Deluxe

1/2 cup vegetable oil

3 eggs

1 cup mini semisweet chocolate chips

2 to 3 cups White Faux Buttercream, recipe follows, colored or swirled with your favorite color

Cupcake Toppings:

Licorice whips

Crushed peppermint candies

Crushed lemon drops

Multicolored jimmies or nonpareils

Mini white and dark chocolate chips

Small chocolate candies

Colored decorating sugars

Cereals such as corn pops, fruit rings or graham cracker cereal squares

White Faux Buttercream:

3 sticks (12 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature

4 cups confectioners’ sugar

3 tablespoons whole milk, at room temperature

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Food coloring, such as yellow, blue and red, or your favorite, if desired

NYC May 09 2 189


Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line two 12-cup standard muffin tins with paper cupcake liners and set aside.

In a bowl, using an electric mixer, mix the cake mix, 1 1/3 cups water, oil and eggs on medium speed until moistened and smooth. Stir in 3/4 cup chocolate chips. Divide the batter evenly among the muffin cups, stirring it occasionally to redistribute the chocolate chips. The batter will nearly fill each liner to the top. Evenly sprinkle the remaining 1/4 cup chocolate chips over the tops of the cupcakes. Bake until the cupcakes spring back when lightly touched, or a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 20 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool.

When cool, put the White Faux Buttercream out with spoons or small spatulas along with bowls of the cupcake toppings for the kids to decorate their own cupcakes.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, using the paddle attachment, whip the butter on high speed until very soft. Meanwhile, place a large sheet of parchment paper on a work surface. Using a large sifter, sift the confectioners’ sugar onto the parchment. This helps prevent clumping and makes the mixing easier. Lower the speed of the mixer and, using the parchment as a funnel, pour half the sugar into the bowl and mix slowly until combined. Add the milk and mix until combined. Once combined, add the remaining sugar with the vanilla and mix. Once it is combined, turn the mixer speed up and beat the icing until very light and fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes. If desired, divide the icing into smaller batches and color with food coloring.

Spread the icing on cooled cupcakes while at room temperature. Refrigerate any leftover icing, but be sure to let it come back to room temperature before using. Re-whip the icing to make it fluffy again. Makes 4 cups (enough for 24 cupcakes).

Yield: about 8 cups, enough for at least 6 dozen cupcakes

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Ease of preparation: easy

Happy Pasta Day!!! – Loaded Chicken Carbonara





6 slices bacon, chopped

1 1/2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breast halves

salt and ground black pepper to taste
3 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 cup white wine
1 1/2 cups grated Parmesan cheese
3 large eggs
1 gallon water
1 pound spaghetti
2 cups frozen peas


  • PREP
   20 mins
  • COOK
   45 mins
  • READY IN  
1 hr 10 mins


  • Cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until crisp, about 10 minutes. Remove bacon from skillet with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel-lined plate. Drain fat from skillet, reserving 2 tablespoons of the bacon drippings.
  • Season chicken with salt and pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon bacon drippings in the skillet over medium heat. Cook chicken breast halves in the bacon drippings until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 5 minutes per side. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the center should read at least 165 degrees F (74 degrees C). Transfer to cutting board and tent with foil. Rest chicken for 5 minutes before slicing; set aside.
  • Heat remaining tablespoon bacon drippings in skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Cook and stir garlic and ground black pepper in skillet until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Pour wine into skillet; cook at a simmer until thickened, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat.
  • Whisk Parmesan cheese and eggs together in a bowl. Slowly stream wine mixture into the Parmesan mixture while whisking continually.
  • Bring a large pot of generously salted water to a boil. Cook spaghetti in the boiling water, stirring occasionally until cooked through but firm to the bite, about 12 minutes. Remove 1/2 cup of the water from the pot for later use.

Put the peas in a large colander. Drain the pasta in the colander with the peas. Return drained pasta and peas to the pot. Stir bacon, chicken, and wine mixture into the spaghetti. Thin sauce with reserved pasta water as desired.

Got an upset stomach? Buy This!!!

Core Offer Banner - 468x60

Happy Gumbo Day!!! – Louisiana Seafood Gumbo Recipe




Olive oil, for sauteing

1 1/2 medium-sized onions, coarsely chopped

1 cup celery, cut crosswise into 1/3 (use the middle 1/3 only) and coarsely chopped

8 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1/2 green bell pepper, coarsely chopped

6 cups baked okra, sliced 1/4-inch thick and baked for about 10 minutes in baking pan

Roux, recipe follows

6 tomatoes, roughly chopped

Stock, recipe follows

1 pound shrimp heads reserved for stock

2 or 3 crabs, cleaned,and chopped into chunks

Lemon slices

Chopped green onions

Serving suggestion: with rice or as a soup


Coat a large heavy-bottomed saucepan with oil and cook the onions until translucent. Add the celery, garlic, bell peppers, and okra. Add the roux and mix thoroughly to pick up all the excess oil in the pot.

Next add the tomatoes and bring the mixture to a boil. When mixed, strain the stock and add it to the pot, mixing thoroughly to prevent lumps. Cover with lid, bring to the boil and cook for 20 minutes. Clean the shrimp and saute in a separate pan to get rid of any excess moisture. When they have turned pink add the shrimp and crab to the gumbo. Cook for 10 minutes. Lastly, add lemon slices and chopped green onions


1/2 cup flour

Olive oil

Combine the ingredients in a separate pan. Brown on a medium high heat until it turns light brown.


9 cups water

Shrimp heads

1 stalk celery

1/2 lemon

1 bay leaf

3 basil leaves

Creole seasoning (recommended: Dash)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Combine ingredients in a large heavy bottomed saucepan. Bring to the boil and simmer for 1 hour.

Yield: 6 servings

Got an upset stomach? Buy This!!!

Core Offer Banner - 468x60

Happy National Sausage Pizza Day!!! – Caramelized onion, sausage and basil pizza recipe by Giada de Laurentiis





Cornmeal, for dusting

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling

1 tablespoon unsalted butter, at room temperature

2 onions (about 1 1/2 pounds), thinly sliced

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 pound spicy turkey or pork sausage, casings removed, crumbled

All-purpose flour, for dusting

1 (13 to 16-ounce) ball pizza dough

3/4 cup (3 ounces) crumbled Gorgonzola or blue cheese

1/4 cup chopped fresh basil leaves



Put an oven rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees F. Sprinkle a heavy baking sheet (without sides) with cornmeal and set aside.

In a large skillet, melt 3 tablespoons of olive oil and the butter over medium-low heat. Add the onions, salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until golden and caramelized, about 20 minutes. Increase the heat to medium-high and add the sausage. Using a wooden spoon, break up the sausage and cook, stirring constantly, until cooked through, about 8 minutes. Set aside to cool slightly.


On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough into a 13-inch diameter circle, about 1/4-inch thick. Transfer the dough to the prepared baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil. Spread the onion mixture evenly over the dough, leaving a 1-inch border. Sprinkle the cheese on top. Bake until the crust is golden and the cheese has melted, about 15 to 17 minutes. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with chopped basil. Cut the pizza into wedges and serve.


Brussels Sprout and Chorizo Beer Hash Recipe by Food 52


Brussels Sprout and Chorizo Beer Hash

  • 1pound Brussels sprouts (outside leaves removed)
  • 3Chorizo links, outer casing removed and crumbled (can also use dried)
  • 1cup beer (I used Great Lakes Dortmunder)
  • 4Large eggs
  • 4Medium blue or red potatoes, halved
  • 1Shallot, diced
  • 3Cloves garlic, minced
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  1. Bring 2 medium pots of salted water to a boil. Toss your whole Brussels sprouts into one for 5 minutes. Toss your potatoes into the other for 10. Drain both.
  2. In a large sauté pan with high sides, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add chorizo and cook for about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and shallots and cook for 3 minutes. Add a bit of salt and pepper.
  3. Trim the bottom of the Brussels sprouts and cut in half. Add your Brussels sprouts to the pan with the chorizo and cook for about 7 minutes, until they have started to brown. Note that the bottom of your pan will start to build a bit of a crust. Worry not: you will de-glaze it with the beer shortly.
  4. Peel the skin off the potatoes, and cut into 1 inch cubes. Toss into the pan after the brussels sprouts have browned. Add a little more salt and pepper to the dish. De-glaze the bottom of the pan with the beer. Let the potatoes cook for about 5 minutes, until they start to brown a little bit. Add more beer if necessary to make sure you get all the flavors off the bottom of the pan.
  5. Cook your eggs in butter with a dash of salt in a separate pan, for about 2-3 minutes, just until the egg white is no longer runny, but the yolk still is. 
  6. Serve the egg over the hash while both are still piping hot! Enjoy.

Credit: Food 52

National Noodle Day!!! – Noodle Facts – 5 Creative Cup Noodle Creations (Video)



  1. Australians consume more than 18 million kilograms of noodles every year – that’s almost one kilogram per person!
  2. In Japan, it is considered good form to loudly slurp your noodles as a way of telling your host that you are enjoying the meal.
  3. Noodles symbolise longevity in China.
  4. Noodles have been created from flour and water since 1000BC and today they are more popular than ever.
  5. Noodles are low in fat and have a very low sodium content.

Credit: Foodimentary Photo Credit: FunnyJunkSite

Got an upset stomach? Buy This!!!

Core Offer Banner - 468x60

Happy Unofficial Pancake Day!!! – Bacon Pancakes w/ Maple-Peanut Butter Syrup




Breakfast ready in 35 minutes! Enjoy this hearty bacon pancake that’s made using Bisquick® mix and served with maple and peanut butter syrup.  


3 – tablespoons peanut butter

1 -tablespoon butter or margarine, softened

1/2 -cup maple-flavored syrup


2 -cups Original Bisquick™ mix

3/4 -cup milk

1/4 – cup maple-flavored syrup

2 – eggs

1/2 – cup real bacon pieces (from 3-oz package)


In small bowl, beat peanut butter and butter with electric mixer on low speed until smooth. Beat in 1/2 cup syrup until well mixed.

Heat nonstick griddle to 350°F or heat 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-low heat.

In medium bowl, stir all pancake ingredients except bacon with wire whisk or fork until blended. Stir in bacon.

For each pancake, pour slightly less than 1/4 cup batter onto hot griddle. Cook 2 to 3 minutes or until edges are dry. Turn; cook other sides until golden brown. Serve pancakes with syrup.

Got an upset stomach? Buy This!!!

Core Offer Banner - 468x60

There is a reason why Owls are the Wiset birds – They’re night Owls (Are Night Owls smarter?)



According to ”Psychology Today,” intelligent people are more likely to be nocturnal than people with lower IQ scores. In a study run on young Americans, results showed that intelligent individuals went to bed later on weeknights and weekends than their less intelligent counterparts.

In ”Study Magazine,” Satoshi Kanazawa, a psychologist at the London School Of Economics And Political Science, reported that IQ average and sleeping patterns are most definitely related, proving that those who play under the moon are, indeed, more intelligent human beings.

His analysis goes back to ancient times, asserting the idea that even in primitive years, people have been known to rise and fall with the sun.

Average brains were conditioned to follow this sleep pattern, while the more inquisitive, intellectual ones want to defy that pattern and create their own.

It’s an unconscious defiance that comes from refusal to acquiesce to the idea of mass appeal.

These findings are reported by “Study Magazine” as such:

Bedtimes and wake-up times for Americans in their 20s by IQ.

Very Dull (IQ < 75)
Weekday: 11:41 pm -7:20 am
Weekend: 12:35 am -10:09 pm

Normal (90 < IQ < 110)
Weekday: 12:10 am -7:32 am
Weekend: 1:13 am -10:14 am

Very Bright (IQ > 125)
Weekday: 12:29 am -7:52 am
Weekend: 1:44 am -11:07 am

Those with IQs less than 75 went to bed by 11:30 pm on weeknights in early adulthood, whereas those with IQs over 125 went to bed around after 12:30 am. This is no coincidence.

The data supports the notion that all night owls feel: the only real time for living is after everyone’s gone to bed.

Only after dark can we learn, absorb and study the effects of the day. It’s a necessary self reflection that few humans take the time to make.

There’s something to be said about those who fight the urge to sleep and explore that block of uncharted time that so many who always have their eyes closed will never see.


All those dreams you can’t have during the day, when you’re snapped out of them by friends, family and work, are finally given time to run around.

Free to play in the open spaces of your mind, you can swim in all those thoughts you hid under your desk or behind mounds of paper work. It’s the most creative time of day, along with the most liberating.

It’s by the nightfall that your most uninhibited and passionate sides are explored. It’s the time to unleash your innermost desires and allow yourself the freedom that’s masked behind the taunting exposure of sunlight.

The night is for testing your limits and challenging yourself. It’s for discovering those passions you suppress all day and breaking down all those rules your parents made to protect you.

It’s the time to dig into those hidden corners of your mind and unknown trails of your subconscious. It’s a time of self-expression that can only be unlocked at night and evaluated by day.


Staying up late has been, and always will be, an act of rebellion. A defiance of the nine-to-five, the very habit of staying up late is revolutionary. Since ancient times, there is evidence that society condoned the night owls.

In the academic paper, “Why The Night Owl Is More Intelligent,” published in the journal “Psychology And Individual Differences,” it’s widely assumed that for several millennia, humans were largely conditioned to work during the day and to sleep at night.

While those who defy the trend, are more likely to “acquire and espouse evolutionarily novel values and preferences than less intelligent individuals.”

These “novel values” become the building blocks of leaders. They are the makings of revolutionaries, inventors and explorers. They are the ones who makes sacrifices and defy the societal pressure to follow the masses.

It’s no surprise that those willing to stay up late, to explore the uncharted territory of night, are more inquisitive.

They are more apt to make discoveries and challenge authority. They want to expand their mind, not shut it off just because people tell them it’s time for bed.


Things that happen at night are things you can’t get away with during the day. It’s the time of utter licentiousness, of underhanded transactions and unseemly occupations.

It’s when the bars are opened and the poets write. It’s when musicians pore over instruments, geniuses have their breakthroughs and artists come alive. According to “Esquire,” it’s also when you have the most sex.

Healthy sex lives and late curfews are indeed, positively correlated. Those reported to have later bedtimes were buying more sex toys and having more sex than their sleepier counterparts.

One sex shop worker believes that intelligence is correlated with open-mindedness, which in turns correlates with a more open sex life.

Those who are willing to stay awake, who yearn for the mysteries of nightfall, are exposed to an array of discoveries that those who stay asleep will never know. It’s those who are willing to test their limits and explore in the dark who will bring more light to the day.


The early bird may get the worm, but the night owl gets the whole jar. While the early risers may get up to see the first worm crawl its way to the wet surface, the night owl gets to them before they burrow under.

Getting up early is most definitely proactive, but staying up late is just as fruitful. Those who stay up get hours ahead, rather than the one or two an early riser gains.

There are things to be explored at night that early risers will never experience. There are ideas formulated and tasks completed that early risers never get to finish.

Because at night, there is dawn and a new day in front of you. But by morning, there’s just the bleakness of night and the daunting end of another day.

Credit: Elite Daily