Not Climate Agreement, But Climate Revolt (The Paris Accords)

GODS & RADICALS

“The withdrawal by the United States, the nation with the second highest carbon output in the world (behind China, whose per-capita emissions are less than half those of the US), seems deeply catastrophic.

It is catastrophic, yes. But not for the reasons we might think.”

Environmental and political analysis, from Rhyd Wildermuth

“Philosophers of freedom were mainly, and understandably, concerned with how humans would escape the injustice, oppression, inequality, or even uniformity foisted on them by other humans or human-made systems. Geological time and the chronology of human histories remained unrelated. This distance between the two calendars, as we have seen, is what climate scientists now claim has collapsed….

The mansion of modern freedoms stands on an ever-expanding base of fossil-fuel use.”

Dipesh Chakrabarty, The Climate of History


The world awoke to the news on Thursday that President Donald Trump announced his intention to withdraw the United States from the…

View original post 1,808 more words

Advertisements

Pretty Ballerina….you’ve got to see her

MyVidenda

fullsizeoutput_59bfullsizeoutput_59efullsizeoutput_59dIMG_4509fullsizeoutput_59cIMG_4518IMG_4516IMG_4523Jeff Koons, “Seated Ballerina” is a mirror polished, colored, stainless steel sculpture that elegantly sits at Rockefeller Plaza….oh and she’s 45ft high! When the light hits her in the right places, she feels like she’s actually moving!

View original post

Beauty

Daedelus Kite

Beauty is transcendent. One should no more attempt to possess and own a beautiful object, idea, mind or person than one should attempt to bottle an ocean wave; a jar full of simple salty water is never again quite the same as the turbulent wilderness of its source. When we ourselves become owned by a beautiful idea (and what is beauty in essence, other than an idea or a perception of mind ?) we often enough fail to see that in aspiring to own, we ourselves become owned by the idea of that thing we initially sought to capture, to possess. To appreciate the beauty and symmetry of an idea or concept is enough for me – I do not need to own anything. One does not need to own a work of art to truly or fully understand or appreciate the deep beauty of its message.

View original post

Ceramic Ladies Beautifully Covered with Tattoos by Jessica Harrison

4

FLOW ART STATION

porcelain-5porcelain-6porcelain-1Jessica-Harrison-Painted-Lady-6Jessica-Harrison-Painted-Lady-7porcelain-2Jessica-Harrison-Painted-Lady-5Jessica-Harrison-Painted-Lady-4Jessica-Harrison-Painted-Lady-2porcelain-81jessicaharrison8Jessica-Harrison-Painted-Lady-9Jessica-Harrison-Painted-Lady-1porcelain-4Jessica-Harrison-Painted-Lady-3porcelain-3Jessica-Harrison-Painted-Lady-8

Ceramic Ladies Beautifully Covered with Tattoos by Jessica Harrison

Scotland-based artist Jessica Harrison creates unique porcelain sculptures with interesting juxtapositions.
In this new series, she applies full body tattoos to delicate women figurines.
via Colossal

View original post

Where My Freelensing Journey Began

THE DETACHED LENS

Freelensing was first introduced to me over two years ago on a photography forum I belong to. Someone shared her experience of experimenting with detaching her lens to take pictures, and I marveled at what she came up with. The works were dreamy, flawed, blurry, photographic prose. I immediately grabbed my Nikon to try it out.

But…it didn’t work. I couldn’t see through the viewfinder, and only saw a black screen when I pressed the shutter button. What was going on?

Coming together on the forum, we soon discovered the problem: the aperture on my Nikkor lens was scrunching closed whenever I removed it from the camera. The only solution was to tape it open, or rig it with a piece of folded paper.

Annoyed, I gave it up for a while.

A few months (?) later, everything changed. I discovered the work of Irene Suchocki, and my interest…

View original post 332 more words

Q: Do you always need to feel inspired to create?

2

 

The Artist Diaries

I’ve been feeling very unmotivated recently when it comes to painting.

To be completely honest, I just feel like I can’t be bothered. I feel lethargic and ‘heavy’ when I think about it, like it’s too much effort for so little in return (meaning either an unfinished painting or worse — a painting I dislike).

Lying in bed last night I remembered several conversations I’ve had over the past couple of years about the nature of motivation and inspiration, and how our feelings aren’t actually the most reliable gauge in terms of whether or not we should do something.

Feeling lethargic and unmotivated doesn’t have to stop me from being creative. In fact, no feeling has the power to prevent me from doing anything without my complicity.

I can complain of feeling horribly uninspired and still put paint on a canvas. I can feel moody and bored and still doodle on a…

View original post 328 more words

Inside the Agora – Be ready for Life by Marcus Aurelius

GET A $600 SIGNING BONUS TO DRIVE FOR UBER

Image result for Uber logo

MAKE $1,000 A WEEK DRIVING FOR UBER

ENTER THIS CODE: RYANF11795UE

Positive Psychology – The Happy Secret to Better work by Shawn Achor

positivity-is-key

Positive psychology is focused on three basic areas of study and practice:

  • Positive emotions, consisting of contentment with the past, current happiness, hope for the future.
  • Positive traits, such as courage, resilience, curiosity, self-knowledge, integrity, compassion, and creativity.
  • Positive institutions, such as community institutions, which can benefit from focusing on the tools developed in positive psychology research.

Positive Psychology: The Evidence on Happiness

Here are some research results that contribute to the field of positive psychology:

  • Activities bring more happiness than possessions. A survey of 150 young adults showed that when asked to rate the happiness value of purchases they hoped would be pleasurable, experience-type purchases, such as trips or meals, outranked objects.
  • Being wealthy does not make you more likely to be happy than other people, as long as everyone’s income is above the poverty level.
  • Grateful people are more likely to be healthy, helpful, and have a greater sense of well-being.
  • Seeing other people do good things makes us want to do good too.
  • An optimistic outlook reduces the risk of physical and emotional health problems.

We believe that we should work to be happy, but could that be backwards? In this fast-moving and entertaining talk from TEDxBloomington, psychologist Shawn Achor argues that actually happiness inspires productivity.

Photo Credit: http://www.mrichatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/positivity-is-key.jpg

Core core core (Ab Workouts)

1

Evolution Gym Talk

The strength of any tree is in its trunk. Your strength comes from your core so make sure you build in some core strengthening to your daily routine.

Training with good form and taking strength from your core will work over time but some specifics will make a difference quicker.

Also take time for your back-” – between the two they are the things standing you up straight every day.

Some ideas from other sites below


View original post

ART – not deliberate, not random, something in between – Jackson Pollock (Art Philosophy) – What do you see?

1
convergencePerhaps his most famous work was a painting entitled Convergence, which was a collage of colors splattered on a canvas that created masterful shapes and lines that evoke emotions and attack the eye. The painting was created in 1952, and is oil on canvas; 93.5 inches by 155 inches (Karmel, 1999). With Pollock’s brushstrokes he was able to make handy use of colors, lines, textures, lights, and contrasting shapes. This painting is enormous and its size can only really be appreciated in person. In 1964, puzzle producing company, Springbok Editions, released Convergence (Inspired by Pollock’s painting) the jigsaw puzzle. It was a 340-piece puzzle that they promoted as “the world’s most difficult puzzle”. The impact of Pollock’s Convergence was evident in 1965 when hundreds of thousands of Americans purchased the jigsaw puzzle.

Picture-028-1024x768 Photo Credit: Frank Fanatic

Jackson Pollock’s style of painting, as exemplified by Convergence, is an important, innovative development in the history of painting. At the time of the painting, the United States took very seriously the threat of Communism and the cold war with Russia. Convergence was the embodiment of free speech and freedom of expression. Pollock threw mud in the face of convention and rebelled against the constraints of societies oppressions. It was everything that America stood for all rapped up in a messy, but deep package. On that same note, some of Pollock’s works were even sponsored by the Congress for Cultural Freedom (an anti-communist advocacy group founded in 1950), which was backed by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) (Karmel, 1999). The CIA appreciated Pollock’s style, because it steered clear of social realism and overt political gestures. Pollock’s abstract work was hard to decipher, but his rebellious nature and expressions of freedom were clearly evident.

What do you see?

ART – NOT DELIBERATE, NOT RANDOM, SOMETHING IN BETWEEN