America’s Lies: I Am Not Your NEGRO

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academichustler1975

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Last Friday (February 3, 2017), I was privileged to watch the documentary called, I am not your Negro featuring James Baldwin and directed by Raoul Peck.  Baldwin was just getting into a new book titled, Remember This House in 1979 on the lives and assassinations of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. and how it affected him during that time.  He was very close friends with each of them and their deaths were particularly hard on him as a black man.  Unfortunately, James Baldwin dies in 1987 and wasn’t able to finish his work…but Raoul Peck decided to bring it alive in 2017.  Thank you, Raoul!  Here are my thoughts on this film.

America’s Lies

America has been lying to all of us for years.  In the film, there was an image of Doris Day with perfect coiffed hair, small waist, beautiful outfit, creamy skin with rosy cheeks…

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February: Affirming a Smart Legacy

BronxBeyondBorders

arturo_alfonso_schomburg Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, born and raised in Puerto Rico and grew to prove that African Americans and African Carribeans have a history, a relevance, and have unleashed countless contributions to their adoptive societies. A great collector of historical documents. Established the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York.

tubman-on-slaves Soldiering, spying, and slave resistance in a time without technology. A wonder.

By:  E. R. Smith

In our early history there was no Snapchat, Instagram, LinkedIn;

Facebook was church.

Social media was all religions and therein movements grew; after decades became televised.

Tweets; kept everyone off the city bus one year.

Instant Message; was the Jim Crow signs in our neighborhoods.

Ping back by reminding everybody; “What preacher said Sunday?”

james-weldon-johnson-poet-quote-as-yet-the-negroes-themselves-do-notLinkedIn was a community barber; or hair salon.

eHarmony was socials, bible study, and family picnics.

What is now thought of as soft, old, corny; schooled the toughest and most tenacious fighters.

Call it dull…

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Black Power, Black Manhood, and Black Womanhood: Voices from the Past and Present

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academichustler1975

‘Wathint’ Abafazi, Wathint’ Imbokodo’

(you strike the women, you strike the rock)

I think this is my time now and I’m goin’ to take it. Anybody’d be crazy not to take it.… I just don’t care about anything else right now but takin’ what my mother and my grandmother oughtta have had and they didn’t get it. —Anonymous black woman interviewed by Josephine Carson, Silent Voices: The Southern Negro Woman Today (1969)

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Spokesmen argued that black men were more damaged by racism than black women, that men should be the leaders, head of the household, and dominant. Black women were empowered and thrilled by the Black Power movement, including the Black Panther Party, but many had critiques of its male chauvinism, common to many nationalist movements.

A central goal of the Black Power and black nationalist political movement was for the black man to recover the manhood that had been destroyed…

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She Looks Like Me: Reflections on Diversity (A Rewrite)

Tay LaRoi

meThe picture to the left is me (give or take a Snapchat filter). My father is a fair-skinned black man and my mother is a white woman, which is why I look the way I do. Due to my mixed heritage, I have a very complicated relationship with my unbelievably curly hair. When it grows, it doesn’t get long, it gets big.  And by big I mean huge. Like, routinely-loose-bobby-pins-in-it-I-am-not-kidding-that-actually-happens huge, which is why I wear it short.  It’s also why I get extremely excited when I meet other girls, primarily mixed and black girls, with hair like mine. I feel like it gives us an instant connection to build on and, if they wear their hair long, I can’t help but admire their patience. I’ve struck up long engaging conversation with total strangers just with complements about their hair, questions about products, and thoughts on styles.

I form a similar…

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Black Woman, Where does it Hurt? EVERYWHERE

academichustler1975

Tonight is New Year’s Eve and I just finished watching the movie, Fences starring Viola Davis and Denzel Washington with one of my girlfriends and it left me speechless.  I went through so many emotions…hate, love, joy, and many more.  It was a great and powerful movie and I really enjoyed it.  The resilience that was expected of black women is still expected today. That’s what was heartbreaking about the movie and why my feelings were contorted in my mind.  I will not bash Denzel’s character because its more than him and his affair and his failed “hoop” dreams.  Throughout the movie it was always about Denzel’s character, Troy Maxson, as a father, and husband along with the emotional invisibility of Rose (his wife) for the past 18 years of their marriage.

Rosein the 1950s is the Rose in the 2000s because our “perfect” role has never…

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Movie Review – The Magnificent Seven (2016)

Bookshelf Battle

Guns. Horses. A town in trouble. White hats and black hats.

BQB here with a review of The Magnificent Seven.

So yesterday I railed against Hollywood reboots and now I’m going to be a hypocrite and tell you that I really enjoyed this remake of The Magnificent Seven (1960) starring Yul Brynner (dead), Charles Bronson (so dead), Steve McQueen (a badass even in death), Brad Dexter (also dead), James Coburn (totally dead), Horst Buchholz (the German James Dean who, like the American James Dean, is dead,) and Robert Vaughn (still alive, huzzah!)

Admittedly, I never saw the original, so the new version was new to me, which just goes to show that reboots are always new to someone and when the inevitable Back to the Future reboot comes out and some dumb kid asks, “There was an original BTTF?” then I will know my time has run out and it…

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Black Girls are Angry too & Politically Invisible (BLW Contributor)

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Why you gonna take me seriously if I don’t show you that I’m in charge of myself? That I’m no joke. You ain’t gonna respect me until you know that what I say is for real. —Samantha, a 14-year-old girl

There ain’t nothing more convincing than a good punch. —Lakeesha, a 16-year-old girl

This girl tried to really mess me up once. She brought three other girls with her. I knew I was gonna get it, so I cracked her on the side of her face with this can that was on the ground. They thought I was so crazy they just picked up their friend and left me alone. —Victoria, a 15-year-old girl

Fighting is about image. It’s about showing you’re no punk. I know I don’t rule the world, but I can feel like I do, make you think I do. Fighting is independence. I beat someone up…

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How Chipotle made hundreds of people barf? – Do you still want to eat at Chipotle?

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After hearing a trickle of reports about food poisoning over recent months, millions of lunch-seeking Americans are probably wondering: Is it safe to eat at Chipotle?

The bad news is that public health investigators haven’t identified the source of the E. coli that sickened almost 60 Chipotle customers in 11 states. By the time they started testing the restaurants and the employees, they couldn’t find a trace of the bacteria.

But that may be a blessing in disguise because without a specific ingredient or supplier to blame, Chipotle has to inspect everything.

Spurred by repeated cases of food poisoning in the past six months — not just from E. coli, but also norovirus (caused by sick workers) and Salmonella (caused by contaminated tomatoes) —Chipotle announced an ambitious food-safety plan that, if implemented, could make Chipotle one of the safer fast food chains out there.

Stacey Dash wants to End Black History Month & the BET Awards – What are your thoughts on her comments?

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Stacey Dash told Fox News, about the ongoing outrage over the lack of minority nominees in major categories, and turned the tables on networks like BET (Black Entertainment Television) for giving awards largely to black recipients.

“I think it’s ludicrous,” the Clueless alum told Steve Doocy. “We have to make up our minds. Either we want to have segregation or integration, and if we don’t want segregation, then we have to get rid of channels like BET and the BET Awards and the Image Awards, where you’re only awarded if you’re black. If it were the other way around, we’d be up in arms. It’s a double standard.”

She took it a step further by saying the U.S. should rid itself of Black History Month, which is celebrated in February. “There shouldn’t be a Black History Month,” she shared. “We’re Americans, period.” Dash became a trending topic on Twitter after the comments went viral. Commenters quickly called out TV personality. 

BET then chimed in via Twitter, linking to a gallery produced by its website titled “Every Time Stacey Dash Proved She Was Clueless.” The network featured some of Dash’s recent controversies, including her comments from Wednesday morning. “She thinks there needs to be a white history month too, since, you know, our ancestors apparently fought for nothing,” BET’s caption read. “Clueless indeed.”

Amid the uproar, Dash again reiterated her points on her blog. “I’ve written about this before, but apparently people are going nuts over what I said on Outnumbered today,” Dash wrote, also bringing up Morgan Freeman’s past comments about Black History Month. (In an old appearance on 60 Minutes,Freeman called the celebration “ridiculous,” saying, “You’re gonna relegate my history to a month?”)

Celebrities boycott the Oscars over lack of diversity – What are your thoughts on the boycott? Are they in the right?

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According to Fox News, in a lengthy Instagram post, Lee said he “cannot support” the “lily white” Oscars. Noting that he was writing on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Lee — who in November was given an honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards — said he was fed up: “Forty white actors in two years and no flava at all,” he wrote. “We can’t act?!”

Lee made a point of writing in his post that the Academy Awards is only part of the problem in an industry with deep-rooted diversity issues. In his Governors Awards speech, Lee said “It’s easier to be the president of the United States as a black person than be the head of a studio.”

“The Academy Awards is not where the `real’ battle is,” wrote Lee on Monday. “It’s in the executive office of the Hollywood studios and TV and cable networks. This is where the gate keepers decide what gets made and what gets jettisoned to `turnaround’ or scrap heap. This is what’s important. The gate keepers. Those with `the green light’ vote.”

In a video message on Facebook, Pinkett Smith, whose husband Will Smith wasn’t nominated for his performance in the NFL head trauma drama “Concussion,” said it was time for people of color to disregard the Academy Awards.

“Begging for acknowledgement, or even asking, diminishes dignity and diminishes power,” she said. “And we are a dignified people and we are powerful.”

She added: “Let’s let the academy do them, with all grace and love. And let’s do us differently.” The video had amassed 4.5 million by mid-Monday afternoon.

But “Boyz ‘N the Hood” director John Singleton, the first African-American director nominated for an Oscar, disagreed.

What are your thoughts on the boycott? Are they in the right?