Black Power, Black Manhood, and Black Womanhood: Voices from the Past and Present

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academichustler1975

‘Wathint’ Abafazi, Wathint’ Imbokodo’

(you strike the women, you strike the rock)

I think this is my time now and I’m goin’ to take it. Anybody’d be crazy not to take it.… I just don’t care about anything else right now but takin’ what my mother and my grandmother oughtta have had and they didn’t get it. —Anonymous black woman interviewed by Josephine Carson, Silent Voices: The Southern Negro Woman Today (1969)

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Spokesmen argued that black men were more damaged by racism than black women, that men should be the leaders, head of the household, and dominant. Black women were empowered and thrilled by the Black Power movement, including the Black Panther Party, but many had critiques of its male chauvinism, common to many nationalist movements.

A central goal of the Black Power and black nationalist political movement was for the black man to recover the manhood that had been destroyed…

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3 comments on “Black Power, Black Manhood, and Black Womanhood: Voices from the Past and Present

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