Smoking Past – Smoking Present by Spearfruit (BLW Contributor)

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Sometimes I will write a post and not finish it for different reasons.  I started this post last year and I do not remember why I did not finish it – but decided now was a good time.

The following words were written on May 17, 2015 –

On social media, I recently read about a person’s encounter with people who smoke.  This person observed a smoker who had no teeth, was coughing and had a ‘smoker’s voice’.  This person wrote that is was clear to them that this was cancer waiting to happen.

I remember a time when employees could smoke at their job in their cubicles.  Many changes have occurred referring to smoking and smokers.  I understand that smoking is bad and can cause illness and death.  I understand smoking affects those people that do not smoke.  I understand the laws that prevent smoking in public buildings and certain areas within a city.  What I do not understand is why those that do not smoke think they can diagnose cancer.  Why is this?

Ok, I get it – I am ranting some because as a smoker I do get a little irritated that nonsmokers seem to know more than I about the outcomes of smoking.  I am a courteous smoker; I do not smoke in my own home, when somewhere else I go hide to smoke as to not bother anyone else and I do not like the smell of smoke – I hate the smell of smoke in clothes, in rooms, etc.

My point is I know smoking kills and I choose to smoke.  I know smoking can kill others and I choose not to smoke around them.  I know smoking can shorten my life span and I am ok with that.

The following words I am writing today –

I have smoked off and on since I was 15 years old – 40 years now! I have quit smoking on several occasions cold turkey with the longest non-smoking period of 4 years.  Why do I quit then to go back to start again?

In my postAddictions or Habits or Routines‘, I concluded with the following –

My point to this post is I have a habit of being drawn to addictions and routinely have quit addictions and started the same addictions again time after time.  So are addictions an issue or is it the routinely stopping and starting the habits of addictions the issue, or is it the habits that cause the routines of addictions the issue?

On my recent visit to my urologist Dr. F., he told me I needed to quit smoking.  He said the tumor on my bladder will have to be surgically removed, and continuing to smoke, the next time the whole bladder may need to be removed.

Today I am still smoking, and tomorrow I will smoke, but the next day is the day I will once again quit – hopefully for the last time.

Check out other great articles from Spearfruit

 

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6 comments on “Smoking Past – Smoking Present by Spearfruit (BLW Contributor)

  1. Smoking and the addiction to smoking are interesting issues. As someone who treats addiction in general and smoking cessation in particular, I would say that I cannot predict cancer. Smoking, obesity and fitness are what I call modifiable risk factors. However, correlation is not causation. Thank you for this post.

  2. I definitely an interesting post. It seems to me that people in this generation have swapped out the smoking addiction for food and then at the end of the day say their are healthier. Obesity is more of a health risk than smoking is, so this thought is absolutely backwards and absurd. Now, the cancer you have, I believe is linked to air quality, so maybe not the case for you but the general population, obesity is more of a risk. I smoke and I’m obese, so I just suck in the health arena. Yet, I’m losing weight but the first thing people say is, your eating healthy but you are still smoking? Yes, I’m working on my biggest risk first and later, hopefully I will get to smoking as well.

  3. Funny how nonsmokers think they know everything.
    It’s similar to meat eaters challenging someone who is vegetarian. A war of words ensues.

  4. spearfruit says:

    Thank you for posting this – 14 days without smoking – and going strong!

  5. lynnkpower says:

    Best of luck to you Spearfruit. Anything you can do to improve yourself is always worth the effort. I quit smoking – for the last time – 14 years, 3 months, and 8 days ago, and it is still hard sometimes. And you know what? It is hard to do so many things that are worthwhile. It is hard to lose weight. It is hard to save money. It is hard to be kind to someone who really pisses you off at work everyday. Take it one minute at a time if you must. Update again soon, please, we’ll be hoping for another positive number from you!

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