Weekend Inspiration – 2014 ESPYS Stuart Scott’s – Jimmy V’s Perseverance Award (Never Give Up)

Full speech & presentation of Stuart Scott receiving the 2014 Jimmy V Perseverance Award.

In this feature, he shares his emotional battle with cancer and follows Jimmy V’s motto to never give up.

Stuart was diagnosed with appendiceal cancer in 2007 and then it came back two years later. Currently, he is still undergoing treatment. He was hospitalized in the last 10 days. 7 day stay in the hospital due to liver complications and kidney failure and 4 surgeries in 7 days. Until a few day’s ago his future was uncertain…

During Stuart’s speech, he talked about living life to the fullest while you’re alive. He also said that it’s about leaning on others for help and not just fighting the battle alone. Stuart even brought his youngest daughter on stage to give her a hug, it was incredibly moving.

What a truly and powerful speech delivered at the 2014 Espy’s.
Show’s us all what is possible even in the face of death!

Don’t Give Up…Don’t Ever Give Up with DVD: The Inspiration of Jimmy V–One Coach, 11 Minutes, and an Uncommon Look at the Game of Life

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Money on my Mind- How to be Successful (Tyler Perry) Motivational Speech

Never Would Have Made It

Leader of the Pack (Business Philosophy) – Reasons Why you will never do anything Amazing with your Life

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Because You Have Not Failed Enough

Because you are comfortable in your mediocrity; because you choose not to try.

Because you think everything is too hard or too complicated so you will just “sit this one out”, or maybe you’ll, “do-it-tomorrow”!

Because you hate your job but won’t get a new one; because it is easy to reject rejection.

Because while you’re sitting around failing to try, I am out there trying to fail, challenging myself, learning new things and failing as fast as possible.

Because as I fail, I learn, and then adjust my course to make sure my path is always forward. Like the process of annealing steel, I’ve been through the fire and pounded into shape. The shape of a sword with polished edges and a razor sharp blade that will cut you in half if you are not equally hardened.

Because You Care What Others Think About You

Because you have to fit in.

Because you believe that being different is only cool if you’re different in the same way that other people are different.

Because you are afraid to embrace your true self for fear of how the world will see you. You think that because you judge others, this means that those people must, in-turn, be judging you.

Because while you’re out spending your money on new outfits, new cars, overpriced meals or nights at the bar, I’ll be investing in myself. And while you try to fit in with the world I’ll make the world fit in with me.

Because You Think You Are Smarter Than You Are

Because you did what everyone else did; you studied what they studied and read what they read.

Because while you were away at college, I was studying life; because instead of learning about the world in a classroom I went out and learned it by living.

Because I know more than any piece of paper you could ever frame from a university. Because smart is not what you learn, it’s how you live.

Because I could pass your tests if I had to, but you couldn’t stand for a single second in the face of the tests that life has thrown me. Tests that are not graded on a bell curve or by percentages; tests that are graded by one simple stipulation: survival!

Because You Don’t Read

Because you read the things you are required to read or nothing at all.

Because you think history is boring and philosophy is stupid.

Because you refuse to acknowledge that all the power in the world comes from the words of those that lived before us. That anything you desire can be had by searching through the multitude of words that are available to us now more abundantly than ever before.

Because You Lack Curiosity

Because you are unwilling to ask this simple question… “What if it’s all a lie?”, and accept the possibility that maybe it is; that just maybe, the methods of mass media are under direct orders to: keep you distracted.

Because you call me a know-it-all but refuse to call yourself a know-nothing-at-all.

Because while you’re busy playing Candy Crush, or Megalopolis, I am reading about string theory and quantum mechanics.

Because if we were to go heads-up in a debate, I would crush you. I would make it a point to defeat my own argument; from every imaginable angle; in order to understand everything you might be able to use against me.

Because I would dedicate myself to understanding both sides of the argument so thoroughly that I could argue your side for you and win; even after having just handed you a defeat in the same debate.

Because You Don’t Ask Enough Questions

Because you do not question authority.

Because you don’t question yourself.

Because you don’t understand the power of properly placed questioning in life, respectful disagreements and standing up for what you know to be right in the face of someone telling you otherwise. Unable to question reality; stuck in a self imposed survival strategy within a matrix-style monotony.

Because I know that you will give me all the information I need to destroy you by letting you talk.

Because I study human behaviors and you ignore everyone but yourself.

Because I watch how you say the things you say just as closely as I listen to what you say; and you say way too much!

Because I study the premise of your argument and destroy it from the ground level before you even get a chance to establish your ideas.

Because You Can’t Handle The Truth

Because you refuse to admit that you don’t even know the things you don’t know.

Because even if I told you everything could be different tomorrow you would wait until then to begin doing anything about it.

Because even when you think I’m not, I’m aware of my surroundings.

Because you think that since I have not acknowledged you, it means that I have not seen you.

Because, you walk around with your head up your ass, oblivious to the world around you. Blissfully ignorant of the reality that sits so close to your face that if you stuck your tongue out, just once, you would taste it and realize how delicious the truth actually is.

Because you would become an instant addict. Unable to pull yourself from the teat of truth. Finally able to understand your lack of understanding, and then you would see; then you would know that the only thing holding you back from doing something truly amazing, is you.

Credit: Medium

Case of the Mondays – Is it that Time on the Month or is it just Rubylicious nail polish?

Feed Me!!! The Downfalls living in a Consumerist Society

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Consumerism

Victor Lebow an economist, retail analyst and author, wrote a very pertinent account of modern consumerism in his 1955 paper, “Price Competition in 1955,” which was published in the Spring issue of the “Journal of Retailing.”

“Our enormously productive economy demands that we make consumption our way of life, that we convert the buying and use of goods into rituals, that we seek our spiritual satisfactions, our ego satisfactions, in consumption. The measure of social status, of social acceptance, of prestige, is now to be found in our consumptive patterns. The very meaning and significance of our lives today expressed in consumptive terms. The greater the pressures upon the individual to conform to safe and accepted social standards, the more does he tend to express his aspirations and his individuality in terms of what he wears, drives, eats, his home, his car, his pattern of food serving, his hobbies.

These commodities and services must be offered to the consumer with a special urgency. We require not only “forced draft” consumption, but “expensive” consumption as well. We need things consumed, burned up, worn out, replaced and discarded at an ever increasing pace. We need to have people eat, drink, dress, ride, live, with ever more complicated and, therefore, constantly more expensive consumption. The home power tools and the whole “do-it-yourself” movement are excellent examples of “expensive” consumption.”

The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don’t Need

CONSUMERISM IS NOT SUSTAINABLE

We have let ourselves to be led down the path of consumption, we have been manipulated into a society of ‘battery hen humans’ where governments, marketers, corporations and interest groups have been feeding us a steady diet of consumerism, laced with deceit, false hopes and non-sustainability.

It all started after the Second World War when economies and much of the Western population were in a state of stability and there were abundant energy resources in the form of coal and oil. What better way to control the masses to promote growth and prosperity than to condition consumers, voters and citizens to consume, consume, consume, everything else is irrelevant.

People talk about ‘the economy’ as if it were a living being. Interest groups such as the financial services sector, government, corporations and politicians discuss confidence, growth, investment, demand, spending, stimulus and consumption as a means to satisfying and appeasing the manic depressive economy. Slowly we are starting to see fragments of change. We have let ourselves become attached to something that offers little real evidence of being able to truly make us happy in the long term. In Buddhism, attachment is one of the key hindrances that causes suffering among humans. The Buddha taught that attachment generates craving, wanting and insecurity. Attachment is the wanting to hold onto and keep a permanent state and not be separated from a thing or person. The general principle behind non-attachment is to cultivate a mind of detachment. Once we do this we can then move towards a mind of oneness which involves compassion, an understanding of impermanence and seeing experiences for what they are.

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WE’RE ATTACHED TO PHYSICAL OBJECTS

Not only have humans become attached to physical objects or things, but also to relationships, ideas and opinions. We anchor or associate happiness, success and fulfillment with these external objects in the hope that we will find lasting happiness. So what do we do? Like the mouse on the treadmill we hope we will eventually get to where we want to be. We are always trying to achieve, in a never ending cycle of wanting and having, thinking this will lead us to lasting happiness.

The current Western economic system with the mantra of growth and prosperity has let us be seduced into a pattern of wanting and external gratification. Most of us have been herded onto the plains of consumerism with the promise this will bring us closer to fulfillment. While on the forest fringes, we see a small group of enlightened beings that realize happiness and contentment comes only from within and cannot be bought, sold, acquired or accumulated.

Non-attachment gives us the freedom, space and time to contemplate the true meaning of life. Attachment distracts us from reality. It influences how we perceive and react to our immediate world. A world of excess leads to a roller coaster of highs and lows. This in turn motivates us to seek out more of those high moments of pleasure. We enter into a hedonistic world of want-fulfillment which creates further wanting in an attempt to bring lasting happiness.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Andrew Martin is passionate about helping raise awareness and living sustainably. He is editor of www.onenesspublishing.com and author of One ~ A Survival Guide for the Future… He is also a writer for Collective Evolution where this was originally featured.

Fight Club

7 – Timeless Lessons From Bill Gates’ Favourite Business Book

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Bill Gates recently revealed that his favourite business book is “Business Adventures,” a 1969 collection of New Yorker articles by John Brooks that illustrate the formation of the modern American corporation.

Gates says he asked Warren Buffett back in 1991 what his favourite business book was, and Buffett responded by sending his personal copy of “Business Adventures.”

Business Adventures: Twelve Classic Tales from the World of Wall Street

Innovators need to keep innovating.

Gates writes that one of the most instructive stories in the book, especially when taken in a historical context, is the article with his favourite title, “Xerox Xerox Xerox Xerox.” Brooks chronicles how Xerox recruited researchers to develop the product that would replace the mimeograph machine and change how offices worked around the world. After the Xerox 914 hit the mass market in 1960, “xeroxing” a document soon became office parlance. Five years later, Xerox brought in $US500 million in revenue.

Don’t release a product before it’s ready.

Xerox’s initial success is important to look at, as well.

Joseph C. Wilson, the company’s founder, inherited The Haloid Photographic Company in the late ’40s. After learning of the physicist Chester Carlson’s invention of an electronic printing machine, he made an agreement with Carlson and decided that his company’s future was in finding a way to turn the experiment into an easy-to-use office tool.

Wilson took the new name of this copying process, xerography, and renamed his company Haloid Xerox in 1958, while the xerography machine was still in development.

Wilson’s board grew anxious as he insisted on the years of R&D the machine required, and Brooks explains that even the researchers weren’t convinced they could create a marketable product. Wilson could have given customers a cumbersome product, but it likely would have bombed and then later improved upon by a competitor. But $US75 million later, the Xerox 914 made Wilson and his executive team rich and Xerox a household name.

Corporate culture matters.

Brooks expresses fascination with Wilson’s do-gooder rhetoric, concluding that it was genuine.

Today, many companies hype their compassionate corporate cultures, but it was less common in the ’60s. Wilson believed that it was his duty to donate millions of dollars to charities and universities and to have progressive hiring policies during the civil rights movement.

Though Wilson’s unorthodox ideas initially faced pushback, it’s widely accepted today that beyond just doing good for others, corporations with a charitable mission or flexible benefits like generous leave for new parents attract motivated employees and promote employee retention. And it’s good PR, too.

Don’t let egos trump research.

Another one of Gates’ favourite case studies in “Business Adventures” is the story of the Ford Edsel, which remains one of the most disastrous product launches in corporate history.

Ford’s executives decided that they would use research to develop the perfect car for middle-class Americans. Its designers and marketers spent two years gathering suggestions from the public and testing ideas on focus groups. But after all that research, Ford’s executives did what they wanted.

They also tried to please everyone instead of focusing the brand. Ford debuted the Edsel in 1957 in 18 variations, none of which seemed to target a particular audience.

As for the name, the chairman of the board decided at the last minute that the car would be named after Henry Ford’s son Edsel, dismissing the list of names that took endless hours to compile.

Don’t put yourself in a situation you can’t get out of.

Before the car was finished or even named, Ford began promoting teasers for the “E-Car,” which promised to revolutionise the automobile industry. Brooks says that the executives never even considered failure an option, creating an entire Edsel division and signing distribution contracts with dealerships before the vehicle was completed.

The stock market took a nose dive in the summer of 1957, and people stopped buying mid-priced cars. The Edsel was set to launch in 1957. Had Ford’s leadership acted more cautiously and avoided betting so much on the Edsel, they likely would have been able to avoid losing $US350 million.

If you fail, accept it, learn from it, and move on.

Despite the countless mistakes that Ford’s leadership made with the Edsel, Brooks found that no one would take responsibility for the failure and felt they had done everything right.

Edsel marketing manager J.C. Doyle even tells Brooks, “People weren’t in the mood for the Edsel… What they’d been buying for several years encouraged the industry to build exactly this kind of car. We gave it to them, and they wouldn’t take it. Well, they shouldn’t have acted like that.”

Managers must communicate clearly with their employees.

Brooks also tells the story of the 1961 price-fixing scandal among 29 electric companies. He looks particularly at the biggest party involved, General Electric, where employees worked on their own to profit from their illegal actions. So many people were lying or withholding the truth from each other that Brooks says it was “a breakdown in intramural communication so drastic as to make the building of the Tower of Babel seem a triumph of organizational rapport.”

Brooks writes that even after researching the case thoroughly, he couldn’t tell if the higher-ups were responsible or at least aware of the price fixing because GE had a culture where nobody seemed to communicate with each other. Multiple employees even testified that their bosses would often say things with a wink, making it difficult to ascertain if what they just said was what they actually meant.

Credit: Business Insider

Money on my Mind – Money, Money, Money

belikewaterproduction:

Why the FUCK not?!!! I always say…if you are creative, persistent, and hardworking, then you should get paid! Everyone deserves the American Dream!

The Pursuit of Happiness (Widescreen Edition)

Originally posted on Creating Your Life journey:

I actually think I would be happier if I was rich. They say money doesn’t buy happiness. But, because I understand that and have suffered for so long without any financial security I think I would be happier. I’ve learned how to be pretty happy without it. I understand that I’m in control of my happiness and it is not based around what I have and what I don’t have. I’ve come to realize life is more fun with lots of friends to spend my time with so it would be hard to move some place warmer. I also know that I’m quite possibly capable of making myself rich. However, just having financial security and being able to travel once a year would be enough, and I know someday I will have that. 

But… If I were rich, rich enough to never worry about money again, which I’ve thought a lot about, I…

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Case of the Mondays – That’s what Office Equipment is there for…

The Physics of Olympic Bodies (Science is Awesome)

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The Olympics is able to capture the imaginations of countries around the world. Though sometimes due to, in no small part, how freaking buff these people are. Every historical trend in world record performances has been positive, meaning that we (a very subjective word) as Olympians have only been getting harder/better/faster/stronger every year! It boggles the mind to think that every year someone one-ups the past by just enough to progress the world record.

What I find even more fascinating though, is how each event in the Olympic event defines the physique of the athlete in question. Training so hard for one event that, for some, you only get one chance to make your mark, it makes sense that the muscles required for your sport will be, shall we say, enhanced… I don’t know if you’ve seen Olympic cyclist thighs (sort of NSFW), but HOLYGEEZUSWOAH that’s intense. Swimmers need to be tall, long-distance runners have a low BMI (body mass index), sprinters have jacked arms to balance out their jacked legs, and power-lifters are just jacked all over. In the end, it’s simply amazing what human beings can achieve with their physical bodies and minds to be living titans on Earth. 

 


Credit: Daily Infographic

 

 

 

Money on my Mind – Core Beliefs of Successful People

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1. “I CAN CHOOSE MYSELF.”

Once you had to wait: to be accepted, to be promoted, to be selected… to somehow be “discovered.”

Not anymore. Access is nearly unlimited; you can connect with almost anyone through social media. You can publish your own work, distribute your own music, create your own products, attract your own funding.

You can do almost anything you want — and you don’t have to wait for someone else to discover your talents.

The only thing holding you back is you — and your willingness to try.

2. “SUCCESS IS INEVITABLE ONLY IN HINDSIGHT.”

Read stories of successful entrepreneurs and it’s easy to think they have some intangible entrepreneurial something — ideas, talent, drive, skills, creativity, whatever — that you don’t have.

  1. Success is inevitable only in hindsight. It’s easy to look back on an entrepreneurial path to greatness and assume that every vision was clear, every plan was perfect, every step was executed flawlessly, and tremendous success was a foregone conclusion.

It wasn’t. Success is never assured. Only in hindsight does it appear that way.

If you’re willing to work hard and persevere, who you are is more than enough. Don’t measure yourself against other people.

Pick a goal and measure yourself against that goal — that is the only comparison that matters.

3. “I AM NOT SELF-SERVING. I AM A SERVANT.”

No one accomplishes anything worthwhile on his own. Great bosses focus on providing the tools and training to help their employees better do their jobs — and achieve their own goals. Great consultants put their clients’ needs first. Great businesses go out of their way to help and serve their customers.

And as a result, they reap the rewards.

If you’re in it only for yourself, then someday you will be by yourself. If you’re in it for others, you’ll not only achieve success — you’ll also have tons of friends.

4. “I MAY NOT BE THE FIRST … BUT I CAN ALWAYS BE THE LAST.”

Success is often the result of perseverance. When others give up, leave, stop trying, or compromise their principles and values, the last person left is often the person who wins. Other people may be smarter, better connected, more talented, or better funded. But they can’t win if they aren’t around at the end.

Sometimes it makes sense to give up on ideas, projects, and even businesses — but it never makes sense to give up on yourself.

The one thing you can always be is the last person to give up on yourself.

5. “I WILL DO ONE THING EVERY DAY NO ONE ELSE IS WILLING TO DO.”

Just one thing. Even if it’s simple. Even if it’s small. Do one thing every day.

After a week, you’ll be uncommon. After a month, you’ll be special.

After a year, you will be incredible.

6. “I DON’T BUILD NETWORKS. I FORGE LASTING CONNECTIONS.”

Often the process of building a network takes on a life of its own and becomes a numbers game.

You don’t need numbers. You need real connections: people you can help, people you can trust, people who care.

So, forget numbers. Reach out to the people whom you want to be part of your life, even if just your professional life, for a long time. And when you do, forget about receiving and focus on providing; that’s the only way to establish a real connection and relationship.

Make lasting connections and you create an extended professional family. You’ll be there when they need you… and they will be there when you need them.

7. “STRATEGY IS IMPORTANT, BUT EXECUTION IS EVERYTHING.”

Strategy is not a product. Binders are filled with strategies that were never implemented.

Develop an idea. Create a strategy. Set up a rudimentary system of operations. Then execute, adapt, execute some more, and build a solid operation based on what works.

Success isn’t built on strategy. Success is built through execution.

Incredibly successful people focus on executing incredibly well.

8. “REAL LEADERSHIP IS MEASURED IN YEARS, NOT MOMENTS.”

“Leaders” aren’t just the guys who double the stock price in six months, or the gals who coerce local officials into approving too-generous tax breaks and incentives, or the guys who are brave enough to boldly go where no man has gone before.

(If you don’t get that last reference, you’re too young. Or I’m too old. Probably both.)

Those are examples of leadership — but typically the kind of leadership that is situational and short-lived.

Incredible leaders can consistently inspire, motivate, and make you feel better about yourself than even you think you have a right to feel. They’re the kind of people you’ll follow not because you have to but because you want to. You’ll follow them anywhere.

And you’ll follow them forever, because they have a knack for making you feel like you aren’t actually following. Wherever you’re headed, you always feel like you’re going there together.

Creating that bond takes time.

9. “WORK COMES FIRST. PAYOFF COMES LATER.”

Ever heard someone say, “If I got promoted, then I would work harder”? Or, “If the customer paid more, then I would do more”? Or, “If I thought there would be a bigger payoff, I would be willing to sacrifice more”?

Successful people earn promotions by first working harder. Successful businesses earn higher revenue by first delivering greater value. Successful entrepreneurs earn bigger payoffs by first working hard, well before any potential return is in sight.

Most people expect to be compensated more before they will even consider working harder.

Incredibly successful people see compensation as the reward for exceptional effort, not the driver — whether that reward is financial, or personal, or simply the satisfaction that comes from achieving what you worked incredibly hard to achieve.

10. “I CAN MAKE HISTORY — AND I WILL.”

You may not make it onto the pantheon of great entrepreneurs. Yours may not become a household name.

But think about the past ten years: technologies, industries, and ways of doing business that were once notions are now commonplace. You can be part of the next wave — whatever it might be. Or you can make a small change your industry. Or you can make a small change in your profession.

You can be at the forefront of a minor or major change, even if only in your community or niche. You just have to be willing to try something new.

Credit: Business Insider