BLW Interview w/ Public Enemy #1 – The Paparazzi, Rick Mendoza

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 WRITTEN BY: RYAN FU @FU_BEATZ

The mere mention of the word paparazzi induces such emotions of discontentment and anger, but why? It’s just another profession where there is supply and demand. People want more intimate stories about their favorite celebrities; so celebrity outlets provide a place where they can get it and photojournalists’ aka the paparazzi help provide that service.

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The word “paparazzi” is an eponym originating in the 1960 film La Dolce Vita directed by Federico Fellini. One of the characters in the film is a news photographer named Paparazzo (played by Walter Santesso). In his book Word and Phrase, Robert Hendrickson writes that Fellini took the name from an Italian dialect word that describes a particularly annoying noise, that of a buzzing mosquito. As Fellini said in his interview to Time magazine, “Paparazzo … suggests to me a buzzing insect, hovering, darting, stinging.” Those versions of the word’s origin are confirmed by Treccani, the most authoritative Italian encyclopaedia, but sometimes contested. For instance, in the Abruzzi dialect spoken by Ennio Flaiano, co-writer of La Dolce Vita, the term “paparazzo” refers to the local clam and is also used as a metaphor for the shutter of a camera lens.

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It is probably the only profession I know that is universally hated by everyone. It is lower than a vagrant and hated more than a parking meter maid. A drug dealer or a hooker has more clout than the paparazzi. Many of these snappers graduated from college and some even had professional training before they entered the other side of Hollywood. There is the other side of Hollywood away from the glitz and glamour, in which the public rarely sees. Sometimes we see super famous people doing things they shouldn’t and occasionally a paparazzi is there to document it all. They make headlines and everyone profits from it except maybe for the celebrity but as the adage goes, “there is no such thing as bad publicity.” The people who profit the most are the celebrity outlets, but you don’t fucking hate them with a passion. I still see a bunch of assholes pack aTMZ tour bus every single day.

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So, the question is why do you hate the regular Joe Schmo on a public street with a camera? Aren’t they just doing their job, in which you can probably see yourself doing if you didn’t have this ignorant view of the paparazzi. Let me be clear, not all of them are a bunch of angels but they are not all bad. Of course, you have a couple of crazy fucks willing to do, what they have to do to make a buck and there are others who are willing to comply with all the rules and regulations. Doesn’t this sound familiar? It sounds like every other job that is out there in America. What is the difference from being the paparazzi from any other occupation out there?

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But to be fair being a paparazzi is not your typically 9 to 5 job. This is why I decided to interview one of the men that you vehemently hate, Rick Mendoza. Rick has been in this industry for many years in which he was there when TMZ first started and has seen the company rise to fame. He has been there for all the stories, in which he himself has been a part of. Do you remember Britney Spears running over a photographer’s foot? Yup, that was Rick’s foot. He’s seen it and done it all. Rick has many alias like The Man with the Black hat, Top Hat Rick, Sellebrity Rick or Robertson Rick. This is where I meet Rick on Robertson Blvd in “Paparazzi Central.”

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Ryan Fu:  What are you famous?

Rick:   I’m not famous maybe popular for photographing celebrities for a long time. People start to recognize you for the things you do.

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Ryan Fu:   Is there is difference between fame and popularity?

Rick:   I think there is because popularity is just recognizing you for what you do and fame is getting paid for what you do. Fame is on a different level because now you are generating income. It’s all about the income.

Ryan Fu:   What did you do before you were a Paparazzi?

Rick:  I was collector in Japan.

Ryan Fu:   Why did you choose this profession?

Rick:   I chose it because I was trying to indirectly sneak into Hollywood. I was looking for a way just to be a part of it because I’m not an actor, writer or producer. But if I can create an illusion that I am from this world maybe it will open some doors for me and it has open doors for me.

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Ryan Fu:   Do you like being paparazzi?

Rick:   I have gotten used to it. I didn’t know the effects coming into it but I knew I had to change the bad stigma it had, so I guess I love it because I believe I’ve changed the bad stigma about what a paparazzi is.

Ryan Fu:   How did you change it?

Rick:   I changed it because I’ve given it a voice were it had no voice. It’s more recognized now. I will show you the real truth about this world.

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Ryan Fu:   What is the truth?

Rick:   The truth is it is a game. It’s a game about hype, money, and economics. It’s about products and marketing. It’s like any other job out there. It’s about keeping the economical machine rolling called“Hollywood” going.

Ryan Fu:   So it’s all about the money?

Rick:   Hollywood is based about just money. People have story lines and great acting abilities but the bottom line is the financial gains that it gets.

Ryan Fu:   What is the best shot you got?

Rick:   I’ve got a handle full of money shots. A few of those shots involved Michael Jackson, and the Royal Family when they came to Los Angeles.

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Ryan Fu:   What are the dos and don’ts as a paparazzi?

Rick:   Be confident and respectful. It’s such an easy game to make money. Just follow the rules and the laws. It’s just common sense and you’ll make money.

But don’t be cocky and believe every shot is the money shot. Don’t go out of away for a shot if it causes you harm and you must be always aware of your surroundings. Don’t think you know it all.

Ryan Fu:   What do you like and dislike about your job?

Rick:   I love the excitement, which I think I am a part of Hollywood indirectly. I’m my own industry in a different realm of Hollywood. I’m the villain of Hollywood and I like that. It’s like every movie, there has to be a villain and I guess I’ll play the bad guy.

What I don’t like is all the ignorant people who didn’t education themselves before they started judging us. They love to point fingers and blame us before they know the whole story. People should take the time to research so they can find out why they hate our occupation. I don’t like the ignorance.

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Ryan Fu:   You don’t mind the haters?

I don’t mind the haters but educate yourself to hate. Don’t just hate because you were taught to hate, learn why you hate.

Ryan Fu:   How do you feel about the media portraying the paparazzi?

Rick:   Personally, I don’t like it. It is usually one-sided and never from the perspective from the paparazzi and when it is, the media usually picks the story where the paparazzi are too aggressive and too reckless. We are not all like that and I hate it when they try to pigeonhole all of us.

Ryan Fu:   What are your thoughts of the new paparazzi laws i.e. the “No Kids Policy.”

Rick:   I can only speak for myself and say I follow all rules and laws. I never got out of my way to break any laws just to get a shot. But these celebrities have to realize that they chose this life. They made themselves into public figures and just because you are rich and have influence, you cannot just change the laws because it inconveniences you.

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Ryan Fu:   Are you the best at what you do?

Rick:   I’m the best for myself and that’s all that matters for me. What makes me successful is that I know myself and I already know that I’ve been successful at this game.

Ryan Fu:   What is your philosophy on business/relationships/ life?

Rick:   Be true to yourself then you can be true to others. You have to live with PASSION.

Ryan Fu:   Have you ever burned any bridges?

Rick:   I’ve burned many bridges. I’ve burned down the mountains that held the bridges.

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Ryan Fu:   What is your ultimate Goal?

Rick:   To live everyday to the fullest and make sure it’s memorable. That makes me excited to wake up everyday.

Does this sound like a guy you should hate? Or does it sound like every person you know that is just trying to make living. In this spiritual weekend I will leave you with this quote that I learned in Sunday school that maybe will change perspective on judging people before you know them, “ Judge not, that ye be not judged. For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you. – Matthew 7:1

Credit: Wikipedia

Check out Rick’s latest interview with Los Angeles Magazine

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Survival of the Fittest: Joe Rogan – Do What You Love, Because Society Is A Trap And Work Is Meaningless

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Question: Are you actually contributing to society or are you just paying the bills?

Here, comedian Joe Rogan talks about work and meaning in his own unique style, asking some important (and sometimes uncomfortable) questions about what our purpose is as a society, and as an individual. Aren’t we supposed to be contributing? He asks. Is contributing the same as working? Rogan concludes that these two things are entirely separate, at least in most cases, and has some thought-provoking advice for anyone who is stuck in a job they hate…follow your dreams instead.

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Survival of the Fittest – Are you Vitamin D Deficient? Symptoms & Reasons why you need Vitamin D

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Vitamin D deficiency is incredibly common in the US, but many Americans mistakenly believe they aren’t at risk because they consume vitamin-D-fortified foods (such as milk).

There are very few foods that actually have therapeutic levels of vitamin D naturally and even fortified foods do not contain enough vitamin D to support your health needs.

Despite its name, vitamin D is not a regular vitamin. It’s actually a steroid hormone that you are designed to obtain primarily through sun exposure, not via your diet.

Signs You May Be Vitamin D Deficient

  1. You Have Darker Skin

African Americans are at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency, because if you have dark skin, you may need as much as 10 times more sun exposure to produce the same amount of vitamin D as a person with pale skin!

As Dr. Holick explained, your skin pigment acts as a natural sunscreen, so the more pigment you have, the more time you’ll need to spend in the sun to make adequate amounts of vitamin D.

  1. You Feel “Blue”

Serotonin, the brain hormone associated with mood elevation, rises with exposure to bright light and falls with decreased sun exposure. In 2006, scientists evaluated the effects of vitamin D on the mental health of 80 elderly patients and found those with the lowest levels of vitamin D were 11 times more prone to be depressed than those who received healthy doses.3

  1. You’re 50 or Older

As mentioned, as you get older your skin doesn’t make as much vitamin D in response to sun exposure. At the same time, your kidneys become less efficient at converting vitamin D into the form used by your body and older adults tend to spend more time indoors (i.e. getting even less sun exposure and therefore vitamin D).

  1. You’re Overweight or Obese (or Have a Higher Muscle Mass)

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble, hormone-like vitamin, which means body fat acts as a “sink” by collecting it. If you’re overweight or obese, you’re therefore likely going to need more vitamin D than a slimmer person — and the same holds true for people with higher body weights due to muscle mass.

  1. Your Bones Ache

According to Dr. Holick, many who see their doctor for aches and pains, especially in combination with fatigue, end up being misdiagnosed as having fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome.

“Many of these symptoms are classic signs of vitamin D deficiency osteomalacia, which is different from the vitamin D deficiency that causes osteoporosis in adults,” he says. “What’s happening is that the vitamin D deficiency causes a defect in putting calcium into the collagen matrix into your skeleton. As a result, you have throbbing, aching bone pain.”

  1. Head Sweating

According to Dr. Holick, one of the first, classic signs of vitamin D deficiency is a sweaty head. In fact, physicians used to ask new mothers about head sweating in their newborns for this very reason. Excessive sweating in newborns due to neuromuscular irritability is still described as a common, early symptom of vitamin D deficiency.4

  1. You Have Gut Trouble

Remember, vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, which means if you have a gastrointestinal condition that affects your ability to absorb fat, you may have lower absorption of fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin D as well. This includes gut conditions like Crohn’s, celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease.

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Vitamin D also fights infections, including colds and the flu, as it regulates the expression of genes that influence your immune system to attack and destroy bacteria and viruses. In this interview above, Dr. Holick expounds on these and many other health benefits of vitamin D. For instance, optimizing your vitamin D levels can help protect against:

  • Cardiovascular disease. Vitamin D is very important for reducing hypertension, atherosclerotic heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. According to Dr. Holick, one study showed that vitamin D deficiency increased the risk of heart attack by 50 percent. What’s worse, if you have a heart attack and you’re vitamin D deficient, your risk of dying from that heart attack creeps up to nearly 100 percent!
  • Autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D is a potent immune modulator, making it very important for the prevention of autoimmune diseases, like multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Infections, including influenza. It also helps you fight infections of all kinds. A study done in Japan, for example, showed that schoolchildren taking 1,200 units of vitamin D per day during winter reduced their risk of getting influenza A infection by about 40 percent. I believe it’s far more prudent, safer, less expensive, and most importantly, far more effective to optimize your vitamin D levels than to get vaccinated against the flu.
  • DNA repair and metabolic processes. One of Dr. Holick’s studies showed that healthy volunteers taking 2,000 IUs of vitamin D per day for a few months up-regulated 291 different genes that control up to 80 different metabolic processes, from improving DNA repair to having effect on autoxidation (oxidation that occurs in the presence of oxygen and/or UV radiation, which has implications for aging and cancer, for example), boosting your immune system and many other biological processes.

Credit: Mercola

Healthometer 349KLX 2-Piece Scale (400 lb x 0.2 lb)

The Dragon’s Philosophy – The Intercepting Fist

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Jeet Kune Do (JKD) literally translated from Chinese means “way of the intercepting fist”. It reflects Bruce Lee’s concepts, philosophy and training methods with regards to martial arts . Bruce Lee who started his base with Wing Chun Kung Fu eventually rejected the notion of sticking to one art and began exploring various other martial arts styles including boxing, judo, wrestling, savate and fencing . Bruce Lee disposed with ideals within a style adopting a flexible approach to seek what works best. He christened his martial art as Jeet Kune Do.

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