Poetry Mondays – The Applicant (Sylvia Plath)

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9to5

First, are you our sort of a person?
Do you wear
A glass eye, false teeth or a crutch,
A brace or a hook,
Rubber breasts or a rubber crotch,

Stitches to show something’s missing? No, no? Then
How can we give you a thing?
Stop crying.
Open your hand.
Empty? Empty. Here is a hand

To fill it and willing
To bring teacups and roll away headaches
And do whatever you tell it.
Will you marry it?
It is guaranteed

To thumb shut your eyes at the end
And dissolve of sorrow.
We make new stock from the salt.
I notice you are stark naked.
How about this suit—-

9to5-Movie-Cast

Black and stiff, but not a bad fit.
Will you marry it?
It is waterproof, shatterproof, proof
Against fire and bombs through the roof.
Believe me, they’ll bury you in it.

Now your head, excuse me, is empty.
I have the ticket for that.
Come here, sweetie, out of the closet.
Well, what do you think of that ?
Naked as paper to start

But in twenty-five years she’ll be silver,
In fifty, gold.
A living doll, everywhere you look.
It can sew, it can cook,
It can talk, talk , talk.

It works, there is nothing wrong with it.
You have a hole, it’s a poultice.
You have an eye, it’s an image.
My boy, it’s your last resort.
Will you marry it, marry it, marry it.

The Collected Poems

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Happy Labor Day for all Working Class Heroes!!! – All I Wanna Do (Sheryl Crow)

The Very Best of Sheryl Crow

Be your own Hero – How Resilient Are You?

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At first glance, these two people seem doomed to failure.He was born in poverty. When his mother died, he dropped out of school to work. He taught himself to read, worked at a series of jobs, and opened a general store with a friend. But his friend was an alcoholic who died, leaving him so deeply in debt he had to auction off all his possessions. He studied law, began practicing, ran for Congress, lost, was elected, then voted out of office. He ran for the Senate, but was defeated twice in a row. Elected president of the United States in 1860, Abraham Lincoln rose above adversity to become one of our nation’s greatest leaders.

She was raised in a dysfunctional family. Her mother rejected her, ridiculing her as “ugly.” Her father was an unstable alcoholic. Bothparents died by the time she was 10, so she went to live with her maternal grandmother and two alcoholic uncles. At 15, she went away to high school, where a wiseteacher recognized and nurtured her strengths. She married a distant cousin, who was later disabled by polio, yet became one of our greatest presidents. Throughout her life, Eleanor Roosevelt persevered, writing, teaching, working ardently for social justice, and after Franklin Roosevelt’s death, served as chair of the United Nations Human Rights Commission, drafting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

What makes such a difference in some people’s lives? What moves them to transcend adversity, embrace a meaningful identity, and become beacons of hope? Stronger than genetics, external conditions, socio-economic status, or education, it is a power deep within us. The Renaissance called it free will: our power to choose and thereby create our own destiny. Smith and Werner’s (1982) landmark study of at risk children in Hawaii who defied the odds called it “resilience”—the ability to thrive despite adversity. While many of their peers developed ill health, behavioral problems, and learning disabilities, the resilient children, who had at least one positive adult role model, grew up with hope and perseverance, learning to see obstacles as challenges (Karren, Smith, & Gordon, 2014, p. 90; Smith &Werner, 1982).

Resilient people don’t give up or give in. They look forward, neither dwelling on the past nor blaming others. Instead of complaining, they ask “What can I do about it?”

In their new book, Supersurvivors (2014) David Feldman and Lee Kravetz offer dramatic accounts of men and women who’ve overcometraumatic experiences to become even stronger, more hopeful, more successful than before. Models of resilience, they demonstrate the remarkable potential of the human spirit.

How resilient are you? You can mobilize your own resilient assets by focusing on mentors and role models, connecting with your own sources of hope and inspiration, and taking positive action, one step at a time.

Credit: Diane Dreher, Ph.D.

Lincoln

Animals are Better than Humans – They’re better Surfers (Ricohet the Surf Dog)

According to Surf Dog Ricochet, this beautiful story is about what we all want — to be encouraged to discover who we really are… to be accepted… to find our life purpose… and to be celebrated for being different. Each person who watches this video finds an individual message that touches them on many different levels, bringing them to tears. It’s about the power of being YOUnique, staying true to yourself, adjusting expectations, being empowered, overcoming challenges, looking at obstacles as opportunities, transformation, inter-connectedness, authenticity, and that anything is possible if you follow your heart.  

Be Like Bacon – Francis Bacon (Knowledge is Power)

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Happy Labor Day Weekend – Sunday Bloody Sunday (U2)

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Happy International Bacon Day!!! – Virgin Chocolate Chunk Brownies With Maple & Benton Bacon

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Virgin Chocolate Chunk Brownies With Maple & Benton Bacon

Ingredients:

Serves: 9-12

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Directions:

  1. Preparation
  2. Preheat the oven to 350F Line an 8-inch (20cm) square baking pan with foil and spray foil with cooking spray.
  3. Melt the chocolate in the microwave or in a bowl set over a pan of barely simmering water. Whisk in the COR olive oil and set aside to cool slightly.
  4. Beat the eggs and sugar in a mixing bowl using high speed of an electric mixer for 5 minutes. Beat in the syrup and salt, then fold in the cooled chocolate mixture. Fold in the BRM flour, then gently stir in the bacon. Pour into the prepared pan.

        5. 
Bake for 20-25 minutes. Mine became aromatic at 20 minutes and at 25 minutes, they had a shiny, dry, slightly crackly top. Let cool completely. Cut into squares.

Happy Labor Day Weekend!!! Be Safe and have Fun – All My Friends (LCD Soundsystem)

This Is Happening

Are you really Sorry? – Reasons why People will Never Apologize

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For non-apologists, saying “I’m sorry” carries psychological ramifications that run far deeper than the words themselves imply; it elicits fundamental fears (either conscious or unconscious) they desperately want to avoid:

  • Admissions of wrong doing are incredibly threatening for non-apologists because they have trouble separating their actions from their character. If they did something bad, they must be bad people; if they were neglectful, they must be fundamentally selfish and uncaring; if they were wrong, they must be ignorant or stupid, etc. Therefore, apologies represent a major threat to their basic sense of identity and self-esteem.
  • Apologizing might open the door to guilt for most of us, but for non-apologists, it can open the door instead to shame. While guilt makes us feel bad about our actions, shame makes them feel bad about their selves—who they are—which makes shame a far more toxic emotion than guilt.
  • While most of us consider apologies as opportunities to resolve interpersonal conflict, non-apologists may fear their apology will only open the floodgates to further accusations and conflict. Once they admit to one wrongdoing, surely the other person will pounce on the opportunity to pile on all the previous offenses for which they refused to apologize as well.
  • Non-apologists fear that by apologizing, they would assume full responsibility and relieve the other party of any culpability—if arguing with a spouse, for example, they might fear an apology would exempt the spouse from taking any blame for a disagreement, despite the fact that each member of a couple has at least some responsibility in most arguments.

By refusing to apologize, non-apologists are trying to manage their emotions. They are often comfortable with anger, irritability, and emotional distance, and experience emotional closeness and vulnerability to be extremely threatening. They fear that lowering their guard even slightly will make their psychological defenses crumble and open the floodgates to a well of sadness and despair that will pour out of them, leaving them powerless to stop it. They might be correct. However, they are incorrect in assuming that exhibiting these deep and pent-up emotions (as long as they get support, love, and caring when they do—which fortunately, is often the case), will be traumatic and damaging. Opening up in such a way is often incredibly therapeutic and empowering, and it can lead them to experience far deeper emotional closeness and trust toward the other person, significantly deepening their relationship satisfaction.

Credit: Psychology Today

 

You got the Wrong Number – DO NOT answer if this number is calling you

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WASHINGTON – If you get a call from the number (202) 609-7070, the Internal Revenue Service is warning you not to answer the phone.

IRS officials said those who call from this number are impersonating the IRS agents and demand payment for fake tax liens.

Authorities said the phony agent, who usually has a heavy accent, will call or leave a voice mail saying you owe money to the IRS and if it isn’t paid immediately you will be arrested.

The IRS says they have received 90,000 complaints to date about the scam and about 1,000 people have lost an estimated $5 million from the fraud.

The IRS said it will never:

  • Never ask for credit card, debit card or prepaid card information over the telephone
  • Never insist that taxpayers use a specific payment method to pay tax obligations
  • Never request immediate payment over the telephone and will not take enforcement action immediately following a phone conversation. Taxpayers usually receive prior notification of IRS enforcement action involving IRS tax liens or levies

If you get a call you believe to be a part of this scam, the IRS urges you call 1-800-366-4484 to report the incident.

For more information on phone scams and how to avoid being defrauded, visit irs.gov.

Credit: Fox13Now