Poetry Mondays – The Applicant (Sylvia Plath)

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First, are you our sort of a person?
Do you wear
A glass eye, false teeth or a crutch,
A brace or a hook,
Rubber breasts or a rubber crotch,

Stitches to show something’s missing? No, no? Then
How can we give you a thing?
Stop crying.
Open your hand.
Empty? Empty. Here is a hand

To fill it and willing
To bring teacups and roll away headaches
And do whatever you tell it.
Will you marry it?
It is guaranteed

To thumb shut your eyes at the end
And dissolve of sorrow.
We make new stock from the salt.
I notice you are stark naked.
How about this suit—-

9to5-Movie-Cast

Black and stiff, but not a bad fit.
Will you marry it?
It is waterproof, shatterproof, proof
Against fire and bombs through the roof.
Believe me, they’ll bury you in it.

Now your head, excuse me, is empty.
I have the ticket for that.
Come here, sweetie, out of the closet.
Well, what do you think of that ?
Naked as paper to start

But in twenty-five years she’ll be silver,
In fifty, gold.
A living doll, everywhere you look.
It can sew, it can cook,
It can talk, talk , talk.

It works, there is nothing wrong with it.
You have a hole, it’s a poultice.
You have an eye, it’s an image.
My boy, it’s your last resort.
Will you marry it, marry it, marry it.

The Collected Poems

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Money on my Mind- How to be Successful (Tyler Perry) Motivational Speech

Never Would Have Made It

Feed Me!!! The Downfalls living in a Consumerist Society

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Consumerism

Victor Lebow an economist, retail analyst and author, wrote a very pertinent account of modern consumerism in his 1955 paper, “Price Competition in 1955,” which was published in the Spring issue of the “Journal of Retailing.”

“Our enormously productive economy demands that we make consumption our way of life, that we convert the buying and use of goods into rituals, that we seek our spiritual satisfactions, our ego satisfactions, in consumption. The measure of social status, of social acceptance, of prestige, is now to be found in our consumptive patterns. The very meaning and significance of our lives today expressed in consumptive terms. The greater the pressures upon the individual to conform to safe and accepted social standards, the more does he tend to express his aspirations and his individuality in terms of what he wears, drives, eats, his home, his car, his pattern of food serving, his hobbies.

These commodities and services must be offered to the consumer with a special urgency. We require not only “forced draft” consumption, but “expensive” consumption as well. We need things consumed, burned up, worn out, replaced and discarded at an ever increasing pace. We need to have people eat, drink, dress, ride, live, with ever more complicated and, therefore, constantly more expensive consumption. The home power tools and the whole “do-it-yourself” movement are excellent examples of “expensive” consumption.”

The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don’t Need

CONSUMERISM IS NOT SUSTAINABLE

We have let ourselves to be led down the path of consumption, we have been manipulated into a society of ‘battery hen humans’ where governments, marketers, corporations and interest groups have been feeding us a steady diet of consumerism, laced with deceit, false hopes and non-sustainability.

It all started after the Second World War when economies and much of the Western population were in a state of stability and there were abundant energy resources in the form of coal and oil. What better way to control the masses to promote growth and prosperity than to condition consumers, voters and citizens to consume, consume, consume, everything else is irrelevant.

People talk about ‘the economy’ as if it were a living being. Interest groups such as the financial services sector, government, corporations and politicians discuss confidence, growth, investment, demand, spending, stimulus and consumption as a means to satisfying and appeasing the manic depressive economy. Slowly we are starting to see fragments of change. We have let ourselves become attached to something that offers little real evidence of being able to truly make us happy in the long term. In Buddhism, attachment is one of the key hindrances that causes suffering among humans. The Buddha taught that attachment generates craving, wanting and insecurity. Attachment is the wanting to hold onto and keep a permanent state and not be separated from a thing or person. The general principle behind non-attachment is to cultivate a mind of detachment. Once we do this we can then move towards a mind of oneness which involves compassion, an understanding of impermanence and seeing experiences for what they are.

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WE’RE ATTACHED TO PHYSICAL OBJECTS

Not only have humans become attached to physical objects or things, but also to relationships, ideas and opinions. We anchor or associate happiness, success and fulfillment with these external objects in the hope that we will find lasting happiness. So what do we do? Like the mouse on the treadmill we hope we will eventually get to where we want to be. We are always trying to achieve, in a never ending cycle of wanting and having, thinking this will lead us to lasting happiness.

The current Western economic system with the mantra of growth and prosperity has let us be seduced into a pattern of wanting and external gratification. Most of us have been herded onto the plains of consumerism with the promise this will bring us closer to fulfillment. While on the forest fringes, we see a small group of enlightened beings that realize happiness and contentment comes only from within and cannot be bought, sold, acquired or accumulated.

Non-attachment gives us the freedom, space and time to contemplate the true meaning of life. Attachment distracts us from reality. It influences how we perceive and react to our immediate world. A world of excess leads to a roller coaster of highs and lows. This in turn motivates us to seek out more of those high moments of pleasure. We enter into a hedonistic world of want-fulfillment which creates further wanting in an attempt to bring lasting happiness.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Andrew Martin is passionate about helping raise awareness and living sustainably. He is editor of www.onenesspublishing.com and author of One ~ A Survival Guide for the Future… He is also a writer for Collective Evolution where this was originally featured.

Fight Club

Going Waaayyyy Back – One Hand in my Pocket – Alanis Morissette (TBT)

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Jagged Little Pill (U.S. Version)

Stop being Depressed & Go Nuts for Cashews – Benefits from Eating Cashews

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Two handfuls of cashews is the therapeutic equivalent of a prescription dose of Prozac. Inside you, the essential amino acid L-tryptophan is broken down into anxiety-reducing, snooze-inducing niacin. Even more important, tryptophan is also made into serotonin, one of your body’s most important neurotransmitters.

Serotonin gives a feeling of well-being and mellowness, or as the Australians would say, “no worries.” This is such a profound effect that Prozac, Paxil and similar antidepressants usually either mimic serotonin or artificially keep the body’s own serotonin levels high. You can do the same thing with your food. And no one can tell us that beans, peas, cheese, nuts and wheat germ are toxic if you eat a lot of them!

Plenty of carbohydrates (starches) in your meals help tryptophan get to where it does the most good: in your brain. In order to cross the blood-brain barrier to get in, carbos are required. So cheese and crackers provides a better effect than the cheese standing alone. An egg or two on toast is better than just the egg. Beans, peas, and nuts already contain carbohydrate, so you are all set there.

Consider that five servings of beans, a few portions of peanut butter, or just one big handful of cashews provides one to two thousand milligrams of tryptophan, which will work as well as prescription antidepressants… but don’t tell the drug companies. Some skeptics think that the pharmaceutical people already know. Here are two quotes in evidence:

“Pay careful attention to what is happening with dietary supplements in the legislative arena… If these efforts are successful, there could be created a class of products to compete with approved drugs. The establishment of a separate regulatory category for supplements could undercut exclusivity rights enjoyed by the holders of approved drug applications.” (Source: FDA Deputy Commissioner for Policy David Adams, at the Drug Information Association Annual Meeting, July 12, 1993)

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Benefits of Eating Cashew Nuts

Who doesn’t know about cashew nuts? Caju is what we call them in India. We use them mostly in sweets and children love to eat them as they are. They are full of anti-oxidants, vitamins and minerals which are required for the normal functioning of the body. They actually belong to Brazil but Portuguese brought them to India in the 16th century. The kidney shaped or bean shaped nuts have many health benefits, a few of which are presented below:

1. Prevents Cancer: Proanthocyanidins are a class of flavonols which fight against tumor cells by stopping them to divide further. These proanthocyanidins and high copper content in cashew nuts help fight against cancerous cells and keeps you away from colon cancer. This is one of the major cashew nut benefits.

2. Healthy Heart: Cashews contain low fat content when compared to other nuts and that too in the oleic acid form which is very healthy for heart. They are cholesterol free and the antioxidants present keeps you away from heart diseases.

3. Lowers High Blood Pressure: Cashew nuts lower your blood pressure with the help of magnesium present in them.

4. Helps Hair: Copper is the mineral which helps your hair get that color. So if you take cashews which are full of copper content, you can get that black hair that you always wished for.

5. Healthy Bones: Like calcium, magnesium is also important for bone health which is the main content in cashew nuts.

6. Healthy Nerves: Magnesium is stored on the bones surface which prevents calcium from entering the nerve cells and thus keeps the blood vessels and muscles relaxed. Insufficient amount of magnesium can lead calcium to enter the blood vessels leading them to contract. It also leads to high blood pressure, migraine headache etc.

7. Prevents Gallstones: Daily intake of cashewnut can reduce the risk of developing gallstones up to 25%.

8. Helps in Weight Loss: Even though cashew nuts are considered as fats, it contains good cholesterol. So contrary to popular belief, those who eat cashews at least twice a week gain less weight when compared to those who eat less.

9. Anti-oxidants: Selenium, copper, magnesium etc. act as co-factors for many enzymes.

10. Helps Digestion: Cashew nuts help in growth and development, nucleic acid synthesis and digestion.

11. High on Vitamins: Cashew nuts are rich in vitamins like riboflavin, pantothenic acid, thiamin, niacin etc. These vitamins keep you safe from sideroblastic anemia, pellagra, etc.

12. Healthy Gums and Teeth: As mentioned before, the magnesium content present in cashew nuts is very good for bones. So it gives healthy teeth as well as strong gums to hold them.

13. Pleasant sleep: After menopause, these cashew nuts can give you relaxed and pleasant sleep during nights.

14. Free Radicals: Cashew nuts help our body to utilize iron properly and eliminate free radicals which cause health problems.

15. Macular Degeneration: Cashew nuts have the ability to filter Sun’s UV rays and protect us from macular degeneration. Now that you know the health benefits of Cashew nuts, ensure that you eat a few once every week I am sure you already love them.

CreditNatural Cures Not Medicine

Exclusive Interview with 2014 NBA Draft Hero – Isaiah Austin talking about Life after Basketball

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Isaiah Charles Austin  is an American basketball player who completed his college career for the Baylor Bears in 2014. He had been considered a first-round prospect in the 2014 NBA draft until he was diagnosed with Marfan syndrome.

In his freshman season at Baylor, Austin was named to the 2013 All-Big 12 third team and the Big 12 All-Rookie team. On April 4, 2013, he recorded 15 points, nine rebounds, five blocks, four assists and two steals in the NIT championship game in which Baylor defeated Iowa 74–54. In 35 games (all starts), he averaged 13.0 points, 8.3 rebounds, 1.1 assists and 1.7 blocks in 29.9 minutes per game.

In April 2013, he declared for the 2013 NBA draft, but later returned to Baylor due to a shoulder injury. In his sophomore season, he was named to the 2014 Big 12 All-Defensive team. In 38 games, he averaged 11.2 points, 5.5 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 3.1 blocks in 28.0 minutes per game. On April 22, 2014, he declared for the 2014 NBA draft, forgoing his final two years of college eligibility.

Isaiah Austin with a friend having a good time shopping in Hollywood, CA. Credit: Zodiac/ Splashnews

Isaiah Austin goes shopping at the Grove in Hollywood Isaiah Austin goes shopping at the Grove in Hollywood Isaiah Austin goes shopping at the Grove in Hollywood Isaiah Austin goes shopping at the Grove in Hollywood

On June 21, 2014, Austin learned that he had been diagnosed with Marfan syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the body’s connective tissue. In an emotional interview with ESPN‘s Holly Rowe, Austin said that he could no longer play basketball at a competitive level since there was too much risk of his heart rupturing. In response, NBA commissioner Adam Silver invited Austin to attend the draft as his guest. Shortly after Austin’s diagnosis was made public, his agent revealed that Austin had taken out an insurance policy against career-ending disability through a special NCAA program. The amount of the policy was not disclosed, but the agent stated that it was at least $1 million. The policy would not have paid out if his career had ended due to the aforementioned shoulder injury or his eyesight, but is expected to pay out due to his Marfan diagnosis.

Austin is blind in his right eye from an injury he sustained in middle school. He had kept the injury a secret, known only to his teammates and close friends until January 17, 2014.

On June 26, 2014, between the 15th and 16th picks of the 2014 draft, Commissioner Adam Silver made Austin a ceremonial pick, which fulfilled his dream of getting drafted. The crowd gave him a standing ovation as he walked up to the podium.

I PULLED A BRITNEY: THE FREELANCE ROLLERCOASTER IS PRETTY WILD

blogcorazon.com.files.2010.03.britney-spears-enojada

WRITTEN BY: MATTHEW SUAREZ @MATINGAS

When you freelance all your life, it is bound to have some ups and downs. My birthday month was definitely an up. I dedicated all my time and energy on a project (TRF) that when it ended, it felt like going down on the Dragster (Cedar Pointe) reaching top speed and in an instant, it is all gone. Just like that, I was at he bottom again. If it wasn’t for friends and family, I would be on the streets right now. Luckily, I have plenty of support, but also, plenty of debt.

More than 20 days have passed since TRF and it feels like it has been years. I felt like I needed to escape from Tijuana or myself. With no money, my escape was to shave my head. I actually just wanted a regular haircut, but my friend that cuts my hair was on vacation. I told a couple of male friends to just shave my head, but they did a horrible job that I ended up doing it myself. I didn’t do a good job myself since I looked like a crackhead mental hospital runaway. Luckily, I found the kindness of a stranger that bought me a beer and help me finish the job (weird huh?)

I already posted about Britney in this blog before. I was there after she shaved her head and talked in weird accents. In the eyes of the world, she acted insane. I don’t think there’s nothing insane about wanting a change in your life and opting on shaving your head. Of course, its way more of a shock when a female does it, but the relief of getting rid of dead weight feels magnificent. In other words, I feel like I comprehend Crazy Spears (to a certain degree).

June is now an uphill battle almost conquered. I’ve been working almost everyday of the month and remain at $0, which is fine since the desire to go out and socialize is null. Instead, I’ve got the World Cup fever, making me miss my first official writing job. I started writing about soccer again, just for pleasure. And luckily, a section that I didn’t know existed in the San Diego Reader picked up my writings.

The last World Cup I lived it in Los Angeles when I lived in Mariner’s Village. Mexico played the opening game and I woke up at 6 am to drink a six-pack of Heineken and watch the game, no one in the area cared about the World Cup except the European paparazzi. Of course I saw many soccer players and took their pictures. In fact, the first picture that I took of someone famous was in January 2001 when my brother recognized Ronaldinho in the airport of Rio de Janeiro. He quickly ran to him and told me to grab a camera. We only had a disposable camera and that did the trick.
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In my real paparazzo days I obviously saw plenty of David Beckham, but I never saw him as a soccer player, but more like an obnoxious and asshole male model. Besides him, I had encounters with plenty others. I almost ran over Landon Donovan once while rushing out of the airport parking lot to send pictures. Instead, I hit the brakes, found the nearest parking spot and jumped out of my car to bother Landon. The US soccer star was on his way to the Superbowl and was nothing but a great guy to me.
December 13 2011 LD
(December 13, 2011)I also saw El Pibe Valderrama walking around Tom Bradley terminal, seemingly lost. I decided not to bother him.
March 29 2011
(March 29, 2011)
I spotted Didier Drogba with his whole family at the security line. They were there for a classic LA visit and Disneyland.
July 13 2010 dd

CHECK OUT MATTHEW’S SITE

http://matingas.com or  http://tijuanaadventure.com

 

Happy Throwback Thursday!!! (Devil Wears Prada) “You sold your soul once you put on those pair of Jimmy Choo shoes”

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Written by Ryan Fu @fu_beatz

After long day of work I needed to unwind and turn off my brain for a sec, which to my surprise Devil Wears Prada was on the tube. I remember my ex taking me to watch this in the theater which I was dreading because it seemed like a “Chick Flick,” but I was pleasantly surprised how it wasn’t it. Of course, if you haven’t seen it yet it’s about a naive young woman played by Anne Hathaway coming to New York and scores a job as the assistant to one of the city’s biggest magazine editors, the ruthless and cynical Miranda Priestly, wonderfully played by legendary actress Meryl Streep.

At first, Anne’s character Andy Sachs just wants to be a real journalist and doesn’t care for fashion much but she gets thoroughly educated as well as I do by Meryl’s character Miranda Priestly how fashion play a major role in society from the high class to the middle class, all the way to the working class. Fashion affects all of us as she teaches Miranda about how important fashion is to her. I love teacher and student relationship between the two, as Andy looks Miranda as figure she can look up to even though she is totally bitchy to her the whole time. Andy sees Miranda, as the woman who she wants to be in the future but is she willing to give up her life for her work.

This brings tension between Andy’s boyfriend played Adrian Grenier. This movie is dominated by women including a break out role from Emily Blunt as the other bitchy assistant, but the men in the movie play an important role in the movie as well. Stanley Tucci is a gem in the movie as a stylist. He is also the only person that is nice to Andy, taking her under his wing. The other men in the film are polar opposites of each other to which one of them is Andy’s comfortable past and Andy’s new exciting future. I think this happens a lot in relationships when one person moves up in life it causes tension in the relationship because one person might be comfortable in a situation but the other wants a change.

Gradually, we see Hathaway’s character change into what she once despised, a fashionable woman. This movie also shows the truths about any business or company where you have to make hard choices regardless of anyone’s feelings for the good of the company. Andy starts being a better assistant, which Miranda can also see making her into the lead assistant that would go to Paris. She makes her go to tell Emily the heartbreaking news, as Emily Blunt tells Hathaway,

“You sold your soul once you put on those pair of Jimmy Choo shoes”

In the end of the film, Miranda decides that Andy is ready to play a bigger role in the company in which Andy is kinda surprised as Miranda tells her that she sees a lot of her inside of Andy but Andy doesn’t want her life. Miranda responses with the best line of the film I think,

“Don’t be silly. Everyone wants to be us.”

Miranda calmly walks outside of the car to a horde of fans while Andy sits in the car and makes a decision that she doesn’t want Miranda’s life. She gets out of the car with a smile and dumping her cellie into a water fountain as Miranda looks for her. Personally, I thought the last part was unrealistic because what kind of person who would actually walk away from that opportunity. I mean of course you would have to put your dream on hold but you could also try making your dream into a reality into the system you are in now.

Besides the ending, I loved the movie. It taught me a lot about fashion, which I have a greater respect for it but it also showed me how much are you willing to sacrifice in order to succeed whether it be your relationship or even your soul. Push comes to shove; I bet you would have not walked away like Anne Hathaway’s character. It’s cool, I’m not judging. I’m a firm believer in doing what you have to do in order to succeed in this cutthroat world.

Money on my Mind- How to make Money as an Artist?

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I’ll bet there are a lot of artists that nobody hears about who just make more money than anybody. The people that do all the sculptures and paintings for big building construction. We never hear about them, but they make more money than anybody. – Andy Warhol

How do you make money as an artist? Many people who aren’t artists wonder this, and many seasoned artists wonder the same thing! Of course artists know that to make money, you must sell work. But there other methods of making money that you may not be aware of.

Commercial Galleries

Commercial galleries typically sell artists’ works at a commission. The typical commission that galleries take is somewhere between 40% and 50% of the sale of the work. This is determined by the contract. Whether you submit your work for sale by consignment or enter into an ongoing relationship with a gallery, the parameters should all be written down in a contract. We have put together two guides for you.

Nonprofit Galleries

Nonprofit galleries typically show work that is young, edgier, and cutting edge. Depending on the gallery, they will take a commission – usually not more than 30%. Nonprofit galleries typically do not “represent” artists or enter into contractual relationships with them.

Out of Studio

Many artists sell their work out of their studio by arranged visits or open studios arranged with other artists. If you are represented by a gallery, that agreement may extend to “studio sales” or all sales of your work. If you do not have a formal relationship with a gallery, you obviously retain 100% of the sale.

Online

More artists are selling their work online. Any commission from an online website would be determined by the terms of use contract that you agreed to. Different sites charge a different percentage of a commission. Anywhere between 1-5% is normal; 10% is on the high end.

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Private Commissions

Artists will do work on a commission basis. If collectors want a personalized work of art like a portrait, they will commission an artist. The artist sets the price and usually asks for a percentage of the price up front.

If you have a formal relationship with a gallery, they will likely take a cut of any commissioned work that they bring to you. Terms of commissions will be stated in your contract. Artists who do a lot of commission work have been interviewed to give you.

Public Commissions

Artists are commissioned for public art usually in connection with a new building or construction project. Many states have a law that specifies that 1% of the total building cost go to art for the building. Usually state and city art groups have the latest information of what program is currently accepting applications.

There are also private funds for public art like The Public Art Fund and Percent for Art. When artists get a public work commission, they typically get 20% of the total cost of the project as an artist’s fee.

Grants

There are many grants for artists. They are very competitive to get, but as one mentor of mine advised me, “Don’t give up until you have applied ten times.” Grants vary in how much money they award. Some grants are privately funded and some are publicly funded. Some are given for a specific project that you propose and some are given outright for the work that you do.

Residencies

There are many residencies for artist to get “away from the world” and focus on their work. The length of the residency varies and the amount of money granted to the artist varies too. Some residencies actually charge money. But many will cover at least some if not all costs. You must apply for these residencies and have a flexible work schedule to go.

Many times the most valuable asset of a residency is not the money granted, but the professional network an artist forms while there. The network may include other artists, guests, curators, and other influential people in the art word.

Museums and Art Centers

Artists generally don’t see a cent from exhibits in a museum. In some cases, however, they do. Installation artists are typically given an artist fee for creating a temporary installation. The fee can be set by you or the museum. Find other ways that museums can help an artist’s career and hear what a curator has to say about the business of museums.

Credit: Art Bistro