Happy National Sourdough Bread Day!!! (Apr. 1st) – Grilled Double-Cheese and Bacon Sandwich

5

Grilled-Double-Cheese-and-Bacon-Sandwich

Ingredients

8

slices bacon

4

(1/4-inch-thick) slices red onion

4

(3/4-oz.) slices Cheddar cheese

4

(3/4-oz.) slices mozzarella cheese

8

(1/2-inch-thick) slices sourdough or Vienna bread

Directions

  • 1
Heat closed contact grill for 5 minutes.
  • 2
When grill is heated, place bacon on bottom grill surface. (If necessary, cook 4 slices at a time.) Close grill; cook 3 to 4 minutes or until browned. Remove bacon from grill; drain on paper towels. Cut bacon slices in half crosswise.
  • 3
With rubber scraper, carefully scrape most of drippings from grill into drip tray. Add onion to grill. Close grill; cook 4 to 6 minutes or until tender.

4
To make sandwiches, layer Cheddar cheese, cooked bacon, onion and mozzarella cheese between bread slices. Place 2 sandwiches on bottom grill surface. Close grill; cook 3 to 5 minutes or until bread is toasted and cheese is melted. Repeat with remaining sandwiches.

Credit: Betty Crocker

The Truth Hurts – There are always going to be Stupid People

3

image

Happy National Tater Day!!! (Mar.31st) – Cheesy Bacon Tater Tots (Sandra Lee)

7

cheese_and_bacon_tater_tots

INGREDIENTS

Nutrition

SERVINGS 4-6

UNITS US

  • 1
(32 ounce) packagepotato tater tots
  • 1 1⁄2
cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • 5 -6 
slices cooked bacon
  • 1 
tablespoon of all purpose seasoning
  • chives (to garnish)
  • sour cream, for dipping

DIRECTIONS

  • Prepare potatoes according to package instructions and sprinkle generously with all purpose seasoning of your choice.
  • When potatoes are fully cooked, crumble bacon over the top and top with cheese of your choice. Good ones to try are chipotle cheddar, cheddar jack, or sharp cheddar.
  • Return to the oven and bake 5-10 minutes until the cheese has melted.
  • Remove from oven, cool for 2-5 minutes and garnish with chives.

Serve with sour cream or your choice of condiments.

Photo Credit: The Cupcake Theory

Recipe Credit: Food.com

Champions Philosophy – Pressure makes Diamonds

6

image

Happy Motivation Monday – Just reminder: You can be Great! All you gotta do is Try…

4

Poetry Mondays – Potential is a Lake by Ryan Fu

lake-in-desert

Potential is a lake

in the desert.

Slowly evaporating

away until

there is nothing. 

Nothing but

the remanence

of what could

have been.

Only the dead

live there.

A vessel

filled with

the might-have-beens.

Surrounded by bodies

of regret

&

guilt. 

It dries up

&

blows away

until it becomes

dust in the wind.

RYAN FU

Unknown

THE HATED ONES

Buy it on Amazon.com

THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO POST ON BLW!!! – SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS, STORIES & IDEAS WITH US!!!

7

WE AT BE LIKE WATER BELIEVE THAT WE ARE ALL PART OF THE LEARNING EXPERIENCE, SO WE WANTED TO REACH OUT TO OUR FRIENDS & FANS TO SAY WE APPRECIATE YOUR SUPPORT

AND WE WANT TO GIVE BACK BY SHARING YOUR OWN THOUGHTS, STORIES OR IDEAS ON OUR SITE.

SO, IF YOU HAVE A STORY OR TOPIC YOU WANT TO SHARE WITH US, JUST LEAVE IT IN THE COMMENT SECTION WITH A LINK TO YOUR TOPIC AND WE WILL POST IT ON BLW,

OF COURSE THE TOPIC HAS TO BE SHARED WITH OUR OWN PHILOSOPHIES. THANK YOU AGAIN!

e988c3b75efa59f25783a11c000d6682 copy

A Champion’s Philosophy – I’m ready to Fail to Succeed (Michael Jordan)

2

image

Weekend Inspiration – Jim Carrey’s Secret of Life – Inspiring Message

9

Are you a Highly Emotionally Intelligent Person?

9

gretel-ella-smith-emotional-intelligence

  1. You have a robust emotional vocabulary

All people experience emotions, but it is a select few who can accurately identify them as they occur. Our research shows that only 36 per cent of people can do this, which is problematic because unlabeled emotions often go misunderstood, which leads to irrational choices and counterproductive actions.

People with high EQs master their emotions because they understand them, and they use an extensive vocabulary of feelings to do so. While many people might describe themselves as simply feeling “bad,” emotionally intelligent people can pinpoint whether they feel “irritable,” “frustrated,” “downtrodden,” or “anxious.” The more specific your word choice, the better insight you have into exactly how you are feeling, what caused it, and what you should do about it.

  1. You’re curious about people

It doesn’t matter if they’re introverted or extroverted, emotionally intelligent people are curious about everyone around them. This curiosity is the product of empathy, one of the most significant gateways to a high EQ. The more you care about other people and what they’re going through, the more curiosity you’re going to have about them.

  1. You embrace change

Emotionally intelligent people are flexible and are constantly adapting. They know that fear of change is paralyzing and a major threat to their success and happiness. They look for change that is lurking just around the corner, and they form a plan of action should these changes occur.

  1. You know your strengths and weaknesses

Emotionally intelligent people don’t just understand emotions; they know what they’re good at and what they’re terrible at. They also know who pushes their buttons and the environments (both situations and people) that enable them to succeed. Having a high EQ means you know your strengths and you know how to lean into them and use them to your full advantage while keeping your weaknesses from holding you back.

  1. You’re a good judge of character

Much of emotional intelligence comes down to social awareness; the ability to read other people, know what they’re about, and understand what they’re going through. Over time, this skill makes you an exceptional judge of character. People are no mystery to you. You know what they’re all about and understand their motivations, even those that lie hidden beneath the surface.

  1. You are difficult to offend

If you have a firm grasp of whom you are, it’s difficult for someone to say or do something that gets your goat. Emotionally intelligent people are self-confident and open-minded, which creates a pretty thick skin. You may even poke fun at yourself or let other people make jokes about you because you are able to mentally draw the line between humor and degradation.

  1. You know how to say no (to yourself and others)

Emotional intelligence means knowing how to exert self-control. You delay gratification, and you avoid impulsive action. Research conducted at the University of California, San Francisco, shows that the more difficulty that you have saying no, the more likely you are to experience stress, burnout, and even depression. Saying no is indeed a major self-control challenge for many people. “No” is a powerful word that you should not be afraid to wield. When it’s time to say no, emotionally intelligent people avoid phrases such as “I don’t think I can” or “I’m not certain.” Saying no to a new commitment honors your existing commitments and gives you the opportunity to successfully fulfill them.

  1. You let go of mistakes

Emotionally intelligent people distance themselves from their mistakes, but do so without forgetting them. By keeping their mistakes at a safe distance, yet still handy enough to refer to, they are able to adapt and adjust for future success. It takes refined self-awareness to walk this tightrope between dwelling and remembering. Dwelling too long on your mistakes makes you anxious and gun shy, while forgetting about them completely makes you bound to repeat them. The key to balance lies in your ability to transform failures into nuggets of improvement. This creates the tendency to get right back up every time you fall down.

  1. You give and expect nothing in return

When someone gives you something spontaneously, without expecting anything in return, this leaves a powerful impression. For example, you might have an interesting conversation with someone about a book, and when you see them again a month later, you show up with the book in hand. Emotionally intelligent people build strong relationships because they are constantly thinking about others.

  1. You don’t hold grudges

The negative emotions that come with holding onto a grudge are actually a stress response. Just thinking about the event sends your body into fight-or-flight mode, a survival mechanism that forces you to stand up and fight or run for the hills when faced with a threat. When the threat is imminent, this reaction is essential to your survival, but when the threat is ancient history, holding onto that stress wreaks havoc on your body and can have devastating health consequences over time. In fact, researchers at Emory University have shown that holding onto stress contributes to high blood pressure and heart disease. Holding onto a grudge means you’re holding onto stress, and emotionally intelligent people know to avoid this at all costs. Letting go of a grudge not only makes you feel better now but can also improve your health.

Credit: Waking Times

Ryan Fu

Unknown

The Hated Ones

Buy it on Amazon.com